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Rendering the past immediate: Imre Kertesz’s Fatelessness

 

Fatelessnessbooksforkeeps.co.uk

 

Review by Claudia Moscovici, author of Holocaust Memories: A Survey of Holocaust Memoirs, Histories, Novels and Films (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, 2019)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/076187092X/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

When Luisa Zielinski interviewed the Hungarian writer, Nobel Prize winner (2002) and Holocaust survivor Imre Kertesz in the Paris Review during the summer of 2013, the author was already suffering from Parkinson’s disease. (See Imre Kertesz. “The Art of Fiction”, Paris Review No. 220, interviewed by Luisa Zielinksi) Despite being seriously ill, Kertesz spoke with characteristic lucidity about his fiction as well as about the Holocaust. Born in 1929 in Budapest, Kertesz was deported to Auschwitz in 1944 for a short period of time, and then transferred to Buchenwald. His works deal with the Holocaust, yet they are not strictly speaking autobiographical. Fatelessness (Vintage International, 2004) in particular seems to parallel Kertesz’s experiences in Nazi concentration camps, but the author focuses on the subject’s historic-philosophical dimensions. Kertesz views his description of the Holocaust in Fatelessness as a rupture of civilization that the entire world should examine and take seriously rather than an anecdote of his own trying experiences during adolescence. “I was interned in Auschwitz for one year,” he recalls. “I didn’t bring back anything, except for a few jokes, and that filled me with shame. Then again, I didn’t know what to do with this fresh experience. For this experience was no literary awakening, no occasion for professional or artistic introspection.” Writing as a mode of reflection and communication with others rather than in order to come to terms with his painful personal experiences assumed, at some point, primary importance for him.

Yet, as Kertesz recounts during the Paris Review interview, he didn’t feel destined to be a writer. Rather, he became a writer by painstakingly editing his own texts. The process of writing wasn’t easy, both because of the difficult subject matter he chose and because he had to hide his endeavors from the Communist regime. In fact, the experience of totalitarian repression forms a common thread between his experience of Nazism and of the repressive regime that followed it. “I was suspended in a world that was forever foreign to me, one I had to reenter each day with no hope of relief. That was true of Stalinist Hungary, but even more so under National Socialism,” he declares.

Despite the broad socio-political sweep of his themes, Kertesz’s fiction, particularly the novel Fatelessness, reads like an intimate psychological account of a young man’s disconcerting and painful experience of being uprooted from his family, schoolmates and friends to be thrust into the alien and brutal world of the Nazi concentration camps. Gyorgy Koves, the 15-year old protagonist, first loses his father, who is deported to and dies in labor camp. His stepmother and a Hungarian employee continue taking care of the family business, a store, and are fortunate enough to survive the war and eventually marry each other. But Gyorgy (George) lacks such luck. Along with a throng of teenage boys, he’s rounded up by the Hungarian Arrow Cross and sent to forced labor, then deported to Auschwitz. Fatelessness depicts his experiences there.

There are countless books on the Holocaust. The subject has been written about so much that some readers risk being jaded to it. This novel is especially effective in rendering this familiar topic new and touching. One of the most unique aspects of the novel is its present temporality: the adolescent narrator describes his experiences in the present, as if writing in a diary, noting every character’s expression and interspersing realistic dialogues without offering much judgment or analysis. Kertesz considers this observational technique as appropriate for a child narrator. As he explains, “a child has no agency in his own life and is forced to endure it all”. While few Jewish victims had much agency during the Holocaust, adults at least had the emotional maturity to realize what was happening to them and understand some of the socio-political reasons why. Child victims, on the other hand, were swept by the Nazi extermination machine without being able to comprehend the events that destroyed their lives or do anything about it. Given the almost existentialist nature of Kertesz’s writing, how much of Fatelessness is based on the author’s life and how much of it is historical fiction becomes far less relevant than the narrative’s powerful and immediate connection to generations of readers.

Claudia Moscovici, Holocaust Memory

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Filed under book review, Claudia Moscovici, contemporary fiction, Holocaust Memory, literary criticism, literature, literature salon

The Holocaust in more personal terms

 

photo by Magdalena Berny

photo by Magdalena Berny

 

Review by Claudia Moscovici, author of Holocaust Memories: A Survey of Holocaust Memoirs, Histories, Novels and Films (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, 2019)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/076187092X/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

For every book I write, be it fiction or nonfiction, there is a personal motivation as well as what I’d call a more “universal” element. I have to feel a strong personal connection to the subject of the book, since, after all, I’ll be studying that subject and writing about it for several years. At the same time, I have to believe that it’s a subject that has some historical weight to it, so that it can interest others as well. This was the dual motivation behind writing my first novel, Velvet Totalitarianism (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing, 2009), translated into Romanian as Intre Doua Lumi (Editura Curtea Veche, 2011). This novel draws upon, in part, my family’s story. But it represents, above all, a slice of life about communist Romania during the dismal last years of the Ceausescu regime.

Right now, I’m working on two books about the Holocaust. The first one, called Holocaust Memory, will be a collection of book reviews of some of the most significant and resonant memoirs, histories and novels about the Holocaust that I can find written (or translated) in English. The subject, I believe, is universal. Although the history of the Holocaust concerns most the Jewish people, this topic is also about social psychology, WWII, and the history of Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan and the U.S. during one of the most trying moments of our collective past. As usual, however, there is also a personal component to my interest in this topic: I’m still haunted by some of the stories my Jewish grandparents told me about the Holocaust when I was a child.

In a fragment of Velvet Totalitarianism which I’d like to share with you below, I pieced together some of the life stories culled, here and there, from conversations with my Jewish grandparents about their experiences during WWII. This is by no means a history of the Holocaust in Romania. It offers a tiny kaleidoscope of family stories filtered by memory which, I hoped as I was writing my novel about communism years ago, I would one day have the know-how and the courage to explore in greater depth.

 

Chapter 10

[…]

“Grandma, what’s a pogrom?” Irina asked.

“You’re too young to learn about these terrible things,” Grandma Sara replied.

“Please tell me. I’ll do my best to understand,” the girl pleaded.

“I know you will. But these are adult subjects. They’re too sad for kids.”

“I’m not a kid any more. I’m already eleven!” Irina objected.

“You’re not a little kid, but you’re still a kid,” the grandmother stroked Irina’s hair.

“But, Grandma, since this happened to our own family…I have the right to know,” Irina insisted with the stubbornness of a child.

Grandma Sara gave in and told Irina, as far as she could recall, an abbreviated version of her family history. “What do you want me to say? We went from a rock to a hard place, as they say. My family’s originally from the Ukraine, a country next to Romania that was part of the Russian empire. Ironically, the reason we came to Romania is because we were running away from the pogroms there.”

“You still haven’t told me what that word means,” Irina reminded her.

“That’s what I’m about to explain,” the grandmother answered. “Long ago, Jews weren’t allowed in Russia itself; they had to live only in this area called the Pale of Settlement, which was part in Poland, part in the Ukraine. Like I said, our family lived in the Ukrainian part. And from time to time, when the tsar or hordes from neighboring villages were looking for someone to blame for their problems, they attacked Jewish villages, stole property, and killed tens of thousands of innocent people.”

“Even children?” Irina wanted to know.

“Yes. Women and children also.”

“But how can people be so mean?” Irina’s pupils expanded.

“The more downtrodden you are, the more you’re mistreated,” was all Grandma Sara could say.

By reading histories of the Holocaust, Irina later learned the details that her grandmother wouldn’t tell her, or didn’t know, or perhaps wanted to forget. Some Jews were shot in mass, but most lost their lives in “death trains” and concentration camps in Transnistria. Thousands of human beings were packed together like cattle in closed, windowless train compartments. Left for days on end without fresh air, water, food or latrines, they died of suffocation, dehydration or illnesses as the train wondered aimlessly around the countryside. Well, not aimlessly. Because by the end of its journey, the objective had been reached. All of its passengers were dead.

“Your grandfather was one of them,” Grandma Sara once told her.

“How did he manage to escape?” Irina asked with a shudder.

Her grandmother shook her head, as if the answer was beyond her grasp: some kind of miracle. “With God’s help, somehow, he jumped from the moving train. He still limps to this day. But at least he’s alive.”

Eventually, many Romanian Jews found their way to what later became the state of Israel, including all of her grandparents’ surviving siblings. In fact, Irina found out from her grandmother, her grandparents were the only ones who didn’t leave the country.

“Why did you and Zeida decide to stay behind?” Irina wondered. “Why didn’t you move to Israel like the rest of the family?”

Her grandmother shrugged: “Romania’s the only place we know. We were born here and so were our parents. This is our country, the only place we called home.”

 

Claudia Moscovici, Literature Salon

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Filed under book review, Claudia Moscovici, contemporary fiction, fiction, Holocaust Memory, literary criticism, literature, literature salon, literaturesalon, the Holocaust, the Holocaust in Romania, Velvet Totalitarianism

Famous couples: Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald was one of the representative couples for America between the two world wars. Both were beautiful and famous. He, a writer that made it young, even though he was not fully recognized by the critics for his real value. She, an ambitious woman, who desired an accomplished man.  Hemingway, Fitzgerald’s good friend, didn’t like Zelda and blamed her for Scott’s failures. He wasn’t the only one. Often, however–especially during the last 20 years–Zelda Fitzgerald was considered a victim: a talented woman that lived in the shadow of a talented man. As usual, the truth probably lies somewhere in between.

Zelda Sayre, the daughter of a judge from Alabama, was a beautiful, ambition woman who, it seems, wasn’t lacking in literary talent. Her letters, a journal and a novel is all we have left from her: all of it included in the 480 page volume edited by Matthew J. Bruccoli. The first biographers attributed to her a secondary role in Scott Fitzgerald’s literary career. In spite of this, Fitzgerald recognized that, aside from his own self, Zelda was his main inspiration. “I truly have married the heroine of my novels,” the author of The Great Gatsby confessed in an interview in 1921.

In 1917, F. Scott Fitzgerald enrolled as a lieutenant, but he quickly realized that he wasn’t made for the army. During this period he wrote his first novel, named (in the first version) The Romantic Egoists, which later became This Side of Paradise. When the novel was published in 1920, the author was 23 years old. In 1918, he met Zelda at a ball close to Montgomery, Alabama. He asked her to marry him but she refused. To entice her, he tried to become rich and famous. It wasn’t easy. His first novel was refused by a big publisher because it was incomplete. He took a job at an advertising firm and created, for 90 dollars a month, slogans for various ad campaigns. Finally, the novel was published by the same publisher that initially refused it. This success won Zelda’s hand in marriage. She excitedly wrote to Scott: “Scott, my darling, Everything seems so easy and simple; this golden dawn. The fact I know I’ll be yours forever–that I belong to you–is truly liberating after all the tensions during the past month…. Waiting doesn’t seem so hard. I love you, my treasure…” Scott was in New York, where he was trying to become well-known to secure a decent living for his future wife. Zelda was still in Montgomery, so her enthusiastic tone can be partly explained by the distance that separated them.

Alexander McKaig, one of Scott’s friends, wrote the following observation in his journal about the new couple: “I visited Scott Fitz and his wife, a very dramatic, provincial Southern belle. She chews gum and shows her knees. I don’t think this marriage can last. Both of them get drunk. I think in a few years they’ll be divorced. Scott will write something important and die at the age of 23 in an attic…”. McKaig later wrote in his journal, after visiting the married couple: “Fitz should leave Zelda alone and stop chasing her…. The sad thing is that Fitz is completely overwhelmed by Zelda’s personality…. She’s the role model for all the feminine characters in his novels…”. Despite these critical remarks, even the author of the journal was eventually seduced by Zelda’s charisma: “She’s, without a doubt, the most beautiful and intelligent woman I’ve met”. Arriving in New York to be close to her husband, Zelda created quite a sensation among her husband’s acquaintances. The couple prospered, also thanks to Scott’s literary success.

In 1925, The Great Gatsby was published.  This novel took care of the 7,000 dollar debt Scott owed, with which the couple travelled to Europe.  The literary reviews weren’t exactly positive; on the contrary. The novel was received with reticence by the critics. To cover his debts, Scott wrote many short stories. Hemingway blamed his wife for the fact Scott become an alcoholic. He also thought Scott was wasting his talent on short stories because of Zelda, writing about his friend: “He represents the greatest tragedy of a talent in our cursed generation”.

In 1929 things didn’t look  good for the Fitzgerald couple. Scott made slow progress on his fourth novel, which exacerbated his depression. He described this situation  in a letter in 1929: “Even so, it’s possible, God willing, that the five years between my realease from the army and finishing Gatsby, thus the years between 1919 and 1924 during which I published three novels, approximately fifty short stories that sold well, a play, plus numerous articles and movie scripts, took everything out of me. On top of this, during this time we also mingled, with great energy, in the most entertaining social circles. … That’s what bothers me, au fond”.  Zelda herself was affected by numerous psychological crises, which become more and more acute. She took refuge in art. She also tried to publish a few short stories.  It seems that some of them were published in both her name and his. Several were signed  by him alone, however, since those paid more. In 1930, the couple grew apart. Zelda isolated herself in her own world and behaved inexplicably, from Scott’s point of view. She couldn’t even bear to have Scottie, their daughter, around her anymore. In 1932, Zelda’s condition worsened.  That same year her own novel, Save Me the Waltz, was published. In 1934, Zelda was sent, following a nervous breakdown, to a hospital near Baltimore.

It was the beginning of the end. Zelda remained hospitalized while, in 1940, Scott Fitzgerald died suddenly from a cardiovascular accident. He was 44 years old and left behind an unfinished novel, Another death in Hollywood. The author was buried discretely, in the presence of a few friends. On March 10, 1948, a fire burst out in the kitchen of the Highland hospital where Zelda was staying. Nine patients lost their lives, including Zelda.

The two of them remain, however, the mythical couple of America between the wars: “two people impossible to unite, whose bond can never be undone,” as Kyra Stromberg writes in her monograph,  Zelda & F. Scott Fitzgerald, published by Editura Paralela 45 in 2004 (translated by Iunia Martin): a book that serves as the inspiration for the story I have told.  Zelda is also the main character of Gilles Leroy’s French novel, Alabama Song, that won the  Prix Goncourt  in 2007 : a novel that brings to the forefront Zelda’s literary talent, which was long overshadowed by her more famous husband.

article by Adina Dinitoiu, Editor of Catchy.ro and of Observator Cultural

(originally published in Romanian on Catchy.ro):

translated from Romanian by Claudia Moscovici

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Between Fanaticism and Terror

HitlerStalinWikipediaCommons

Review by Claudia Moscovici, author of Holocaust Memories: A Survey of Holocaust Memoirs, Histories, Novels and Films (Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, 2019)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/076187092X/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

During WWII much of Europe was caught in a vice between fanaticism and terror; between Hitler and Stalin. The plight of tens of millions of people falling victim to Stalinism on the one hand and Fascism on the other is eloquently captured by a Polish prisoner in Russia:   “I think with horror and shame of a Europe divided into two parts by the line of the Bug, on one side of which millions of Soviet slaves prayed for liberation by the armies of Hitler, and on the other millions of victims of German concentration camps awaited deliverance by the Red Army as their last hope” (Gustaw  Herling, A World Apart, 175-76).

The similarities between the two dictators obsessed with acquiring unlimited power are far greater than their differences. Yet it’s worth noting that they selected their targets differently. Stalin’s purges covered every segment of society, almost indiscriminately: the Communist party; the Politburo; even the army, navy and air force in a time when preparations for war should have been a priority. On the other hand, Hitler honed in on one main target: the Jews. His single-minded focus on destroying the Jewish people could only be called, in his own words, “fanaticism”. He remarked: “Any violence which does not spring from a firm spiritual base will be wavering and uncertain. It lacks the stability which can only rest in a fanatical outlook” (Mein Kampf, 171). What could have led a human being to want to efface the Jewish people from the face of the Earth? There are many hypotheses about what might have caused Hitler’s hatred, ranging from psychological to sociological and biographical explanations. These explanations, however, only make sense in hindsight. Nothing in Hitler’s adolescence, when pathology usually shows up, gave any clear sign of the tremendous anti-Semitic hatred that was lurking within him.

Biographers state that Hitler was a mediocre student, receiving bad grades in physics, mathematics and German. His did better in art, but wasn’t that original. As a young man, he pursued his artistic career in Vienna for about six years. Some state that Hitler’s anti-Semitism grew out of his frustration that he wasn’t accepted to the prestigious Vienna Art Academy. They speculate that he may have blamed his failure on the Jews. Yet there’s evidence to the contrary as well.  Hitler continued to sell his art and make a living from the art sales, supplemented by funds from his family.  Interestingly, as Raul Hilberg states, “Apparently, two of the dealers were Jews.” (Perpetrators, Victims, Bystanders, 4).

WWII seems to have been a major turning point in Hitler life. Yet even then nobody could have guessed that this mediocre soldier would rise to absolute power—and wield destruction—throughout Europe. He was decorated the Iron Cross First Class during the war, but only the second or third time he was recommended for it: incidentally, by a Jew (Lieutenant Gutmann). At the end of the war, Hitler was gassed and spent time recuperating in a hospital. There he had time to contemplate what might have brought about the humiliating defeat of Germany. The company commander of the unit to which Hitler belonged in 1919 asked the question why Germany had lost the war. Hitler wrote down an answer that was to echo the major themes of Mein Kampf, his autobiographical treatise written in prison and published in 1925-26. He distinguished between an anti-Semitism based on reason, which would have staying power, and an anti-Semitism based on emotion, usually expressed in pogroms, which wouldn’t efface the Jews from the face of the Earth. (Perpetrators, Victims, Bystanders, 5)

So to return to our earlier question: why did Hitler target the Jews as the main scapegoat and object of his vitriol? He himself offers a direct answer to this question in Mein Kampf:

“The art of leadership,” Hitler states, “as displayed by really great popular leaders in all ages, consists in consolidating the attention of the people against a single adversary… Where there are various enemies… it will be necessary to block them all together as forming one solid front, so that the mass of followers in a popular movement may see only one common enemy against whom they have to fight. Such uniformity intensifies their belief in their own cause and strengthens their feeling of hostility towards the opponent” (Mein Kampf, 110).

This statement reflects the cold and calculated reasoning Hitler alluded to as early as the note of 1919.  He targeted the Jews as his scapegoats and victims for strategic reasons. Hitler’s explicit intent is to simplify the root of all social and economic problems to the Jews—outsiders in practically every European culture–and coalesce all forces and people against this common enemy. This choice isn’t primarily a matter of genuine emotion, nor only of a pathological, sick hatred. As for Stalin during the Great Terror, it’s primarily the product of an insatiable, malicious will to power. This ultimate answer–which boils down to evil for its own sake–could have never offered a satisfactory response to the question most often scribbled by victims on cell walls, in prisons, concentration camps and gulags, a question which still echoes to this day:  “Zachto—Why?

Claudia Moscovici, Holocaust Memory 

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Filed under Claudia Moscovici, history, Hitler, Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives, Holocaust, Holocaust Memory, why the Jews

Finding (the elusive) Room of one’s own: Interview with Bookblog about being a writer

A room of onee's own

Finding (the elusive) Room of one’s own: Interview with Bookblog about being a writer

Claudia Moscovici

In 1929 Virginia Woolf published a series of lectures that she delivered in 1928 at Newnham and Girton colleges (the women’s colleges at Cambridge University), which we  know under the title “A Room of One’s Own”. She argued that women don’t have their own creative space, both figuratively, in the male-dominated tradition of male writing, and literally, meaning the time and space to write. I think that nowadays few writers, both male and female, have a room of one’s own. For the vast majority of creative writers, writing is a passion, a talent, even an identity, but it is no longer a profession. To put it bluntly, most writers can’t earn a consistent living from it. Even journalism is barely hanging on, as the major newspapers in the U.S. are bought at low prices and blogging has taken over what used to be professional journalism. Ever since I was in college, at Princeton University, I’ve dreamt of being a fiction writer. Knowing, however, that writing isn’t a full-fledged profession, I didn’t take the plunge until my family and I achieved some level of financial stability. I studied and got a doctorate in Comparative Literature at Brown University and became a literary critic and professor for nearly 15 years. Although I had some financial stability at that point, I wouldn’t say that I had a room of my own, either literally or figuratively. I was busy raising a young family, my lovely kids Sophie and Alex, so I didn’t have much time to write fiction.bookbloginterview3

Professionally, for many years I wrote scholarly essays and books. To give voice to my creative side, in  2002 I founded an art movement called postromanticism (http://postromanticism.com), devoted to some of the aesthetic values that I thought were being neglected in contemporary art: verisimilitude, passion, sensuality and beauty.Cover of Romanticism and Postromanticism

The internet became, to some extent, a room of my own: a space where I could discover and interact with artists from all over the world (France, the U.S., Switzerland, Taiwan, Romania, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, etc.) who shared my aesthetic vision. But I still didn’t have the time and space to fully express my own creativity as a writer until I became a full-time writer in 2008 and subsequently published my first novel, Velvet Totalitarianism, in 2009 (translated as Intre Doua Lumi, Editura Curtea Veche, 2011) and my second novel, The Seducer (2011). At that point in my life, my children were old enough that they no longer needed to be nurtured in the same way, or in the same space with me at all times. My space as a writer changed again and I could finally have the time and place to write.

Bookbloginterview1

I write at my desk on a Mac computer, with my cat Jewel serving as a constant companion (and, I’d say, also muse). As all my Facebook friends know from the cat pictures I post, I’m a big cat lover. This is why I chose a picture of Jewel in my library as one of the photos included for this interview. This picture of my cat perched on my books also shows that even when I write fiction I still follow some of the research habits  that I acquired as a scholar. I research throughly every novel I write. To write Velvet Totalitarianism, for instance, I read dozens of books on communism, the Ceausescu dictatorship, the political history of Romania and the revolution of 1989. To write The Seducer, a novel about psychopathic seduction that follows the structure of my favorite novel, Anna Karenina, I researched psychopathy, narcissism and other personality disorders. The plots of my novels may be fiction, but to write about anything that has a basis in history, psychology or sociology I believe that one has to have some foundation in facts.

Seducer Cover

We are used to thinking of writers as being occupied mostly with writing. I believe this too has become a fiction. If the writer has a family, then a large part of his or her life revolves around that family’s needs. Second, a writer has to wear many hats, so to speak: researcher, writer, and publicity director all in one. As a literary critic, fiction writer and founder of an international art movement, the publicity hat is very large for me. I not only have to publicize my own books, but also the postromantic movement and the art of the dozens of artists I collaborate with (you can see some of my essays about them on my art blog, http://fineartebooks.wordpress.com).bookbloginterview2

This is why for this interview I’ve included a press photo of me during my visit to Romania, taken by Claudiu Ciprian Popa, for the launch of my novel Intre Doua Lumi, in 2011. Book publicity has become almost as important to me as the computer at which I write. And this isn’t just because nowadays publicity has become a necessity: without effective publicity most writers wouldn’t be read. It’s also because I’m trying to find a place in the publishing industry that isn’t that of simply being a writer. I’ve witnessed enormous changes in this industry in the U.S., as most of the small and medium publishing houses have died, or been swallowed by the large publishers. Even the large publishing houses have had to merge to survive. Most authors are left without a publicity budget, which means with less consecration and access to readers and reviewers. The final picture I’m including of this room of my own is a still shot from the movie video book trailer for my novel “Velvet Totalitarianism,” called “Velvet Love,” made by Andy Platon.

bookbloginterview4

This photo indicates the direction I believe the publishing industry will take: namely, producing relatively inexpensive, creative and cutting-edge ways in which individual authors and publishers will publicize books in the future. In the past few years my writing space, or room of my own, has changed yet again, to encompass a network of collaborations among the various arts, including music, film and literature, which I believe will become increasingly important to authors and publishers alike.

Claudia Moscovici, Literature Salon

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Filed under A Room of one's own, Andy Platon Velvet Love, book review, Claudia Moscovici, contemporary fiction, fiction, interview with Bookblog, Intre Doua Lumi Claudia Moscovici, Intre Doua Lumi Curtea Veche Publishing, literary criticism, literature, literature salon, literaturesalon, Velvet Love, Virginia Woolf A room of one's own

Staying a Step Ahead of the Competition in Publishing: Music Video Book Trailers

Velvet Love by Andy Platon

Velvet Love by Andy Platon

MUSIC VIDEO BOOK TRAILERS: Staying a Step Ahead of the Competition in Publishing

by Claudia Moscovici

Both publishers and authors are becoming increasingly concerned with the question of how to promote books effectively, capture the interest of readers and generate sales. Given the number of books out there, without an outstanding publicity campaign, each given book risks passing unnoticed. Currently, the competition for readers is tremendous. An  astronomical number of books are published each year. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) cites that roughly 2,200,000 books are published annually. Out of curiosity, I looked up the two countries I write about most which, not coincidentally, are also those where I’ve lived: the U.S. and Romania. In 2010, 328,259 were published in the U.S. and in 2008 14,984 books were published in Romania. Given this large number of books published in the U.S. alone, it’s difficult to believe how difficult and competitive the process of publishing can be (as I explain in an earlier article on the subject):

in English:

in Romanian:

And yet publishing your manuscript is only the beginning of the gargantuan task of rising to the surface in an ocean of books. In fact, the UNESCO study probably doesn’t even count the number of self-published books via Amazon Kindle, Lulu and many other self-publishing options. On the one hand, the mass media makes sharing our cultural products easier in some ways, by facilitating access to an audience. For instance, anyone can self-publish and promote a novel nowadays, through blogs, twitter,  youtube and other popular venues on the internet. But this apparent democratization of culture also makes it a lot tougher to stand out from the crowd. Each cultural product–be it a novel, a collection of poems, a song, a film or a painting–competes with tens of millions of others. It’s hard to find or discern anymore what we value and what we don’t in this tidal wave of information that assails us from all directions on a daily basis.

noise

To draw another analogy, it’s as if we heard talented classical musicians playing their instruments at the same time as others howl, scream, talk and yell in various languages. Or, if you prefer to avoid making any value judgments, as if we heard them playing at the same time as other talented musicians practice other songs. Either way you look at it, what reaches our ears will sound like a maddening cacophony, to the point that we can no longer discern the music we prefer from  the surrounding noise we’d like to ignore. In a world of information (and publication) overload, effective publicity and keeping up with the rapid changes in the mass media can make the difference between success and failure.

bordersbooks

When I taught literature and aesthetics at the University of Michigan, I also helped organize a few  panels in the Ann Arbor Book Festival for several years. In this function, I witnessed up close and personal the struggles of one of the biggest book stores internationally, the Borders Group Inc., which was one of our main sponsors for the book festival. As is well-known, Borders faltered in the face of growing competition from Amazon.com as well as its direct competitor, Barnes & Noble. After downsizing for a few  years, the company eventually declared bankruptcy in February 2011. Barnes & Noble swallowed its former rival, taking over Borders’ trademarks and customers.

penguin_books_random_house_a_l

A similar phenomenon can be witnessed in the world of publishing. Two decades ago, when I first began creative writing, there were dozens of small presses in the U.S. Now there are hardly any left, both because they can’t compete with the major publishing houses and because self-publishing has taken a big bite out of their sales. Many of those that survive have been assimilated into larger publishing houses. And they are not alone. During the past decade, even the mainstream publishers often group together into larger conglomerates. For instance, one of my favorite publishers of literary fiction, Farrar Straus & Giroux, which has published internationally renowned authors such as Isaac Bashevis Singer, Tom Wolfe, Jonathan Franzen and  Jeffrey Eugenides, forms a conglomerate with the MacMillan Publishing group. On July 1st 2013, two of the biggest publishing houses, Penguin and Random House, joined forces to form Penguin Random House. This megapublisher is predicted to account for a quarter of book sales in the U.S., as  Julie Bosman explains in her July 1, 2013 article on the subject in The New York Times:

This merger may be partly in response to the fact that starting in 2009, Amazon.com, the biggest online book seller in the U.S., launched several (selective, as opposed to self-publishing) imprints of  foreign and genre fiction. These include AmazonEncore (out-of-pront or self-published books that sell well), AmazonCrossing (books in translation), Montlake Romance and Thomas & Mercer (mystery novels). In May 2011, Larry Kirshbaum, the former CEO of Time Warner Book Group, took over Amazon Publishing to create a new general-interest imprint.

amazonpublishing

To summarize the increasingly competitive and volatile environment of the publishing industry: many authors are choosing self-publishing rather than wallowing indefinitely in the “slush piles” of highly selective and largely inaccessible literary agents; small presses have been swallowed by bigger ones (or gone out of business); large book sellers have faced bankruptcy and even mainstream publishers have had to merge to continue to thrive in the industry. But even these changes may not be enough. More publishers will sink and more publicity is needed–for authors, book sellers and publishers alike–to survive in such a highly competitive environment, where mainstream success is almost as statistically rare as winning the lottery.

Effective book publicity has become a necessity. Unfortunately, even for authors publishing with the big mainstream publishers, a decent publicity budget is not easy to come by. Ebooks continue to grow in popularity, which may be great news for readers but not necessarily for writers and publishers. Even taking into account the fact they largely eliminate the distribution cost and entirely eliminate the shipping and handling cost, ebooks generate smaller revenues than print books, which means, overall, fewer profits. This, in turn, means a general decrease in publicity budgets. Also, please keep in mind that publicity budgets aren’t equally distributed among authors. The major publishing houses allocate most of their annual publicity budget on a handful of books they predict will sell that year, most of which are written by celebrities (like Paris Hilton or George Bush) or authors who already have proven sales. This leaves the vast majority of published authors to fend for themselves and generate their own publicity: through blogs, social networks, twitter, contacting libraries and bookstores, however they can.

This discussion brings us full-circle to the initial problem I broached in this article: the difficulty of standing out in this deluge of mass media communication, where pretty much every author does his or her best to be heard and read. So how can you stand out if you aren’t one of the lucky few who get a major publisher’s annual publicity budget? I’d like to propose a new method–music video book trailers–that is innovative, cutting-edge and appeals to potential readers’ senses and imagination, to awaken their interest books.

I came upon the idea of music video book trailers partly through good fortune (of working with a cutting-edge major publishing house in my native country, Romania, Curtea Veche Publishing)–and partly because I was actively seeking opportunities of getting involved in such a project. Ever since I’ve been a teenager I loved pop music and jazz and was intrigued by the power of music videos to capture viewers’ attention not only through catchy music, but also through spectacular filmic scenes that can rival the best movie trailers.

Cover Intre Doua Lumi

Once I found out from my publisher that  my first novel,Velvet Totalitarianism, would be launched in Romanian translation (under the title Intre Doua Lumi) in September of 2011, I began exploring the possibility of collaborating with talented Romanian composers and musicians for a music video/book trailer of my novel. Via LinkedIn, I met the Romanian singer, composer, director and producer Andy “Soundland” Platon, who ended up doing a wonderful music video based on my novel, called Velvet Love:

 

Andy Platon is a Romanian pop music prodigy.  I say “pop music” only because that’s what he excells at best. But Andy has enormous range both in terms of the scope of his talents–as a composermusic video director and producer andsinger–and in the versatility of his musical abilities, from classical music to pop music and everything in between. Andy made his debut while still only a teenager in 2009 with the song Lost Without You, which became a finalist in the competition Battle of Songs. This show  was featured not only in Romania, but also in France, Russia and Turkey. Lost Without You was also nominated for the Shockwave NME Music Awards 2010. More recently, he’s known for his collaborations with Troy Lynch – The BeatBoyz (T.I.Gucci Mane, 112), Loredana Groza and  Marius Nedelcu  featuring  Alexandra UngureanuIrina PopaXoniaAnthony Icuagu (ex. Insane), Ianna Novac (ex. ASIA, Ladies). Recently, he has established his own production company, called Fonogram Studios and is collaborating with internationally renowned musicians, such as Kris Searle.

Andy Platon’s new single and music video,  Velvet Love,  performed by the talented singer Marcel Lovin, captures with feeling and sensibility some of the most poignant scenes of my novel  Velvet Totalitarianism, including the complex dynamics between the main characters, Radu and Ioana, as they struggle with the tension between their love for each other and harassment by the Secret Police. As an art critic I found the video to be very artistic–almost photographic in feel–showing clearly Andy’s eye for capturing each scene in a single image, as well as the talent of his co-producer and Director of PhotographyAnthony Icuagu. The main actors–Ioana Picos as Ioana and Mihai Marin as Radu–did a wonderful job playing the romantic couple in the novel, whose risky love for each other may be saved by their parental love for their son, Lucian, played by Alia Anastasiei.

velvetmoscovici

In general, music video book trailers have the following advantages for generating publicity for both authors and publishers:

1. They appeal to most of our senses. At their best, they’re musically catchy, visually stimulating and dramatic enough to stage a narrative that leaves viewers eager to find out more about your book.

2. They’re international. If posted on youtube, vimeo and other public venues, music video book trailers can quickly reach an international audience. If you wish to target only readers who speak a certain language, such as Romanian, French or Russian, then you can do them in that language.

Seducer Cover

3. Music video book trailers allow for a flexible budget. They can be as expensive as you can afford or as inexpensive as you desire. Before meeting the music composer and producer Andy Platon, I did my own music video book trailers and posted them on youtube. Though they certainly lacked professional filming equipment and original music, they still reached thousands of readers and were effective advertising tools. I’m including below my music video book trailer for my second novel, The Seducer:

4. They involve fruitful collaborations among the arts–music, film, acting and literature–so they’re by nature artistically complex and interesting.

5. They are amenable to various sources of funding, such as donors, investors and crowd funding, which do not depend strictly on the publicity budget your publisher is willing to allocate for your book. In fact, crowd funding has become an increasingly popular and effective way of raising revenues for artistic projects. For information about some of the most promising crowd funding options, I’m including below Chance Barnett‘s article on the subject, published in Forbes Magazine:

6. Best of all, like crowd funding itself, music video book trailers offer a more or less democratic means of advertising. This doesn’t mean, of course, that this method generates equal results for all authors. But it does mean that it’s accessible to every author: whether or not they published with a mainstream publisher, independent publisher, or self-published; whether or not their publisher invested their annual publicity budget in their work; whether or not they have connections in the entertainment industry, and whether or not they have a lot of money at their disposal for book publicity. Moreover, since this method of advertising is relatively new, music video book trailers offer can offer authors and publishers a way of staying ahead of the competition.
Claudia Moscovici, Literature Salon

 

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Filed under Andy Platon Velvet Love, Andy Soundland Platon, Barnes & Noble, book publicity, book review, Claudia Moscovici, contemporary fiction, Curtea Veche Publishing, Editura Curtea Veche, fiction, Fonogram Studios, Ioana Picos, literary criticism, literary fiction, literature, literature salon, literaturesalon, Staying a Step Ahead of the Competition in Publishing: Music Video Book Trailers, The Seducer by Claudia Moscovici, Velvet Love by Andy Platon, Velvet Totalitarianism

The George Enescu Festival: Hitting A High Note in Romanian Culture

George_Enescu_Festival

The George Enescu Festival: Hitting A High Note in Romanian Culture

by Claudia Moscovici

The George Enescu Festival in Bucharest is not only a highlight in Romanian culture, but also one of the most exciting and biggest classical music festivals in Europe. Named after the prestigious Romanian composer and violinist George Enescu  (1881-1955), who is best known for his Romanian Rhapsodies, the festival focuses on Enescu’s work and offers the best in classical music, internationally.

Enescu1

Every two years, for several weeks during the month of September, Bucharest becomes the classical music capital of Europe. George Enescu and his friend and collaborator George Georgescu organized the first festival in 1958. Although the festival was banned for a period of time during Ceausescu’s dictatorship, it has been reestablished and grown since the Romanian revolution of 1989. It is organized by its Artistic Director Ioan Holender, Artexim, ArClub–The Center for Cultural Projects of the Municipality of Bucharest and the Foundation Art Production. 

Festivalul-George-Enescu

In 2013, the festival will take place between September 1st and 28th, featuring concerts  of classical and contemporary music as well as opera and ballet. The festival’s motto, “Magic exists” (“Magia Exista”), emphasizes the beauty of classical music; its capacity to mesmerize all generations across cultural boundaries; its unifying force regardless of our political and ideological differences; its endurance throughout centuries, in a magic that still captivates us. Few products of the human mind, talent and creation have such a lasting power and positive effect on our cultures and psyches.

This year the festival will reach an even wider public through its publicity campaign on the American channel CNN (see ad below) that will air on May 19th, as well as the broadcast of some of its concerts live in cinemas across Romania, in cooperation with Grand Cinema Digiplex.

For more information about the highlights of the festival this year, please find below the George Enescu Festival program, found on their website,

  • MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMII

  • RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALE

  • CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢII

  • SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALET

  • SERIA WAGNER

  • MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂI

  • CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

  • ALTE EVENIMENTE

Barenboim

DUMINICĂ, 01.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : DANIEL BARENBOIM
Solist : RADU LUPU – pian

Program :
G. Enescu – Rapsodia română nr. 2 în Re Major op. 11
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 4 pentru pian şi orchestra în Sol Major op. 58
Sir E. Elgar – Simfonia nr. 2 în Mi bemol Major op. 63

Cameron Carpenter

DUMINICĂ, 01.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

CAMERON CARPENTER

Ateneul Român
Recital CAMERON CARPENTER – orgă

Program :
“The Theatre of the Organ”

Martin Yates (2)

DUMINICĂ, 01.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

TIMIŞOARA

FILARMONICA “BANATUL” DIN TIMIŞOARA
Dirijor : MARTIN YATES
Solist : MATEI VARGA – pian

Program :
Tiberiu Olah – Armonii IV, Omagiu lui Enescu, concert pentru 23 de instrumente
Michael Hersch – Concert pentru pian şi orchestră (primă audiţie europeană)
T. Huillet – “Ombres – tribute to Debussy”
Rolf Martinsson – Concert pentru orchestră, op. 81

Ansamblul Archaeus

LUNI, 02.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Ansamblul “ARCHAEUS”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : LIVIU DĂNCEANU

Program :
George Balint – Muzică pentru Archaeus
Michael Denhoff – 
Strophen op. 107 (nr. 1, Geträumtes – für Martella)
Ştefan Niculescu – 
Triplum II
Michael Denhoff – 
Strophen op. 107 (nr. 11B, Geläut für Günter Bialas)
Dan Buciu – 
Schițe pentru un autoportret
Michael Denhoff – 
Strophen op. 107 (nr. 43A-a, Trostgesang für Heidemarie Merkl-Baroski)
Horia Surianu –
 Reverie Byzantine en Canon
Michael Denhoff – 
Strophen op. 107 (49A – Saltarello)
Javier Darias – 
Ucanca
Aurel Stroe – 
Humoreske mit zwei durchblicken zum leeren

Radu Lupu 1

LUNI, 02.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului

STAATSKAPELLE BERLIN

Dirijor : DANIEL BARENBOIM

Program :
W.M. Mozart – Concertul pentru două piane în Mi bemol Major K365

Solişti :

DANIEL BARENBOIM
RADU LUPU

G. Verdi – “Quattro pezzi sacri” (Ave Maria; Stabat Mater; Laudi alla Vergine Maria; Te Deum)
Cu participarea CORULUI FILARMONICII “GEORGE ENESCU”
Dirijorul Corului : ION IOSIF PRUNNER

MARŢI, 03.09

14:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂI

NEW GENERATION (I)

Universitatea Naţională de Muzică Bucureşti – Studioul de Operă şi Multimedia

NEW GENERATION (I) – Concert interactiv al tinerei generaţii de compozitori români

Interpretează : Ansamblul IconArts

Dirijor : GABRIEL BEBEŞELEA

Matei Varga

MARŢI, 03.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

FILARMONICA “BANATUL” DIN TIMISOARA

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : MARTIN YATES
Solist : MATEI VARGA – pian

Program :
Tiberiu Olah – Armonii IV, Omagiu lui Enescu, concert pentru 23 de instrumente
Michael Hersch – Concert pentru pian şi orchestră (primă audiţie europeană)
T. Huillet – “Ombres – tribute to Debussy”
Rolf Martinsson – Concert pentru orchestră, op. 81

Yuja Wang

MARŢI, 03.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Dirijor : MANFRED HONECK
Solist : YUJA WANG – pian

Program :
P.I. Ceaikovski – Concertul nr. 1 pentru pian şi orchestră în si bemol minor op. 23
D. Şostakovici – Simfonia nr. 5 în re minor op. 47

MIERCURI, 04.09

14:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂI

NEW GENERATION (II)

Universitatea Naţională de Muzică Bucureşti – Studioul de Operă şi Multimedia

NEW GENERATION (II) – Concert interactiv al tinerei generaţii de compozitori români

Interpretează : Ansamblul IconArts
Dirijor : GABRIEL BEBEŞELEA

Sergei Dogadin

MIERCURI, 04.09

17:00

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC OF RUSSIA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : VLADIMIR SPIVAKOV

Solist :  SERGEY DOGADIN – vioară

Program :
G. Enescu – Suita nr. 3 pentru orchestră op. 27 “Săteasca”
E. Chausson – Poemul pentru vioară şi orchestră op. 25
C. Saint-Saëns – Introducere şi Rondo Capriccioso op. 28
S. Rahmaninov – Simfonia nr. 1 în re minor op. 13

Radu Lupu 1

MIERCURI, 04.09

19:30

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

RADU LUPU

Ateneul Român
Recital RADU LUPU – pian

Program :
Fr. Schubert – Sonata pentru pian în La Major D 959
Fr. Schubert – Sonata pentru pian în Si bemol Major D 960

Jorg Widmann

MIERCURI, 04.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

CLUJ

FILARMONICA DE STAT “TRANSILVANIA” CLUJ
Dirijor : JÖRG WIDMANN

Program :
Ulpiu Vlad – Simfonia I “Lumina drumurilor”
J. Widmann – Concertul pentru trompetă şi orchestră mică în Si bemol Major “Ad absurdum” (dedicată lui Sergei Nakariakov)
Solist : SERGEI NAKARIAKOV – trompetă
J. Widmann – Misa, pentru orchestră mare
Solişti : TEODORO ANZELLOTTI – acordeon cu claviatură
WILHELM BRUCK – chitară

JOI, 05.09

14:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂI

NEW GENERATION (III)

Universitatea Naţională de Muzică Bucureşti – Studioul de Operă şi Multimedia

NEW GENERATION (III) – Concert interactiv al tinerei generaţii de compozitori români

Interpretează : Ansamblul IconArts
Dirijor : GABRIEL BEBEŞELEA

Leo Hussain

JOI, 05.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

FILARMONICA DE STAT “MOLDOVA” IAŞI

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : LEO HUSSAIN
Solist : MARINO FORMENTI – pian

Program :
Cornel Țăranu – Simfonia “Memorial”
Sir Peter Maxwell Davies – Concertul pentru pian şi orchestră op. 188
Harrison Birtwistle – Earth Dances

Vilde Frang 2

JOI, 05.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRE DE PARIS

Dirijor : PAAVO JÄRVI

Program :
H. Berlioz – Uvertura la “Le Corsaire” H 101
B. Britten – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în re minor op. 15
Solistă : VILDE FRANG – vioară
C. Saint-Saëns – Simfonia nr. 3 cu orgă în do minor op. 78
Solist : THIERRY ESCAICH – orgă

Arcadia Quartet

VINERI, 06.09

13:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

“ARCADIA” STRING QUARTET

Universitatea Naţională de Muzică Bucureşti

Program :
Adrian Pop – Opt bagatele pentru cvartet de coarde
Ulpiu Vlad – Pe acest pământ însorit II
Martin Torp – Cantico delle creature
Dan Variu – Cvartet de coarde (primă audiţie)
Sabin Păutza – Cvartetul de coarde nr. 4 “Ludus Modalis”

Jorg Widmann

VINERI, 06.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

FILARMONICA DE STAT “TRANSILVANIA” CLUJ

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : JÖRG WIDMANN
Program :
Ulpiu Vlad – Simfonia I “Lumina drumurilor”
J. Widmann – Concertul pentru trompetă şi orchestră mică în Si bemol Major “Ad absurdum” (dedicată lui Sergei Nakariakov)
Solist : SERGEI NAKARIAKOV – trompetă
J. Widmann – Misa, pentru orchestră mare
Solişti : TEODORO ANZELLOTTI – acordeon cu claviatură
                    WILHELM BRUCK – chitară

Peter Seiffert

VINERI, 06.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALETCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA ŞI CORUL OPEREI NAŢIONALE BUCUREŞTI

Opera Națională Bucureşti
“OTELLO” de Giuseppe Verdi

Dirijor : KERI-LYNN WILSON

Regizor : VERA NEMIROVA

Scenograf : VIORICA PETROVICI

Maestru de cor : STELIAN OLARIU

Asistent regie : IRINA MACOVEI 

Distribuţia :
Otello – PETER SEIFFERT
Desdemona – NICOLETA ARDELEAN
Iago – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Cassio – CRISTIAN MOGOŞAN
Roderigo –ANDREI LAZĂR
Ludovico – MARIUS BOLOŞ
Montano – IUSTINIAN ZETEA
Un herald – IONUŢ GAVRILĂ
Emilia – MARIA JINGA

Paavo Jarvi

VINERI, 06.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRE DE PARIS

Dirijor : PAAVO JÄRVI

Program :
G. Enescu – Simfonia nr. 1 în Mi bemol Major op. 13
S. Prokofiev – Simfonia nr. 5 în Si bemol Major op. 100

Europa Galante

VINERI, 06.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

EUROPA GALANTE

Ateneul Român
Dirijor şi solist : FABIO BIONDI

Program :
A. Vivaldi – Simfonia pentru orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în Sol Major “Il Coro delle Muse” RV149
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în la minor RV357
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în mi minor RV279
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în Si bemol Major RV383a
A. Vivaldi – Uvertura la opera “Ercole su’l Termodonte” RV710
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în Fa Major RV284
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în Re Major RV204
A. Vivaldi – Concertul pentru vioară, orchestră de coarde şi b.c. în Fa Major RV291

VINERI, 06.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

CRAIOVA

FILARMONICA “OLTENIA” DIN CRAIOVA

Dirijor: THEO WOLTERS (OLANDA)

Solişti:

LIVIU PRUNARU – vioară
CECILIU OVIDIU IŞFAN – violă

Program:
Gioacchino Rossini: Uvertura operei „La Cenerentola” („Cenuşăreasa”)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Simfonia concertantă în Mi bemol major pentru vioară, violă şi orchestră, K. 364
Antonín Dvořák: Simfonia a VIII-a în Sol major, op. 88

European Contemporary Orchestra

SÂMBATĂ, 07.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

EUROPEAN CONTEMPORARY ORCHESTRA

Sala mică a Palatului

Program :
A. Iorgulescu – Kaleidoscope (p.a.)
M. Padding – 
Hop – Creation ECO 2012
T. Hearne – 
First World – Creation ECO 2012
Fr. Narboni – 
Embarquement pour l’outre-là – Creation ECO 2012
P-A Charpy –
 Brûlures – Creation ECO 2012 
Liviu Dănceanu – 
Hexaih op. 147 (p.a.)

Tammuz

SÂMBATĂ, 07.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

“TAMMUZ” Quartet

Ateneul Român
Invitat : OLIVER TRIENDL – pian

Program :
R. Fuchs – Cvartetul cu pian nr. 2 în si minor op. 75
G. Enescu – Cvartetul cu pian nr. 2 în re minor op. 30
G. Fauré – Cvartetul cu pian nr. 2 în sol minor op. 45

Bertrand De Billy

SÂMBATĂ, 07.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

CORUL şi ORCHESTRA FILARMONICII “GEORGE ENESCU”

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : BERTRAND DE BILLY
Dirijorul corului : IOSIF ION PRUNNER

Program :
A. Schönberg – Gurre-Lieder

Distribuţia :
Tove – VIOLETA URMANA
Waldemar – NIKOLAI SCHUKOFF
Klaus – JOHN DASZAK
Waldtaube – JANINA BAECHLE
Peasant – THOMAS JOHANNES MAYER
Narator – MARCEL IUREŞ

Claudio Cavina

SÂMBATĂ, 07.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Ansamblul “LA VENEXIANA”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : CLAUDIO CAVINA

Corul de cameră “PRELUDIU” al Centrului Naţional de Artă “Tinerimea Română”
Dirijorul corului : VOICU ENĂCHESCU

Program :
Claudio MONTEVERDI: L’ORFEO (1607)

Distribuţia :
La Musica/Euridice: Roberta MAMELI
Orfeo: Furio ZANASI
Messaggera: Josè Maria LO MONACO
Proserpina/Ninfa: Monica PICCININI
Plutone: Raffaele COSTANTINI
Speranza: Josè Maria LO MONACO 
Caronte: Salvo VITALE
Apollo/Pastore: Luca Cervoni 
Pastore II – Spirito I: Alessio TOSI
Pastore III: Raffaele PE’
Pastore IV – Spirito II: Mauro BORGIONI

Minguet Quartet

DUMINICĂ, 08.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

“MINGUET” Quartet

Sala mică a Palatului

Program :
Gabriel Iranyi – Cvartet de coarde nr. 4 (2012) “…Innenräume, Verwebungen…”
Peter Ruzicka – Cvartetul de coarde cu soprană solo nr. 6 “Erinnerung und vergessen” (2008)
Solistă : SARAH MARIA SUN – soprană
Wolfgang Rihm – Patru studii pentru cvartet cu clarinet (2003)
Solist : JÖRG WIDMANN – clarinet

Pierre Yves Artaud

DUMINICĂ, 08.09

14:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Ansamblul TRAIECT

Dirijor : Sorin Lerescu

Solist : Pierre-Yves Artaud – flaut
Program :
Tiberiu Olah – “Invocaţii” pentru 5 executanţi
Ede Terényi – “Traiectorie albă” pentru ansamblu
Laura Ana Mânzat – “Rondo neconvenţional” pentru ansamblu (p.a.a.)
Anatol Vieru – “Feuerwerk”  pentru flaut, vibrafon şi vioară
Elena Apostol – “Fairytale” pentru ansamblu
Sorin Lerescu – “Proportions II” pentru flaut şi ansamblu instrumental

Tiberiu Soare

DUMINICĂ, 08.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Ansamblul “PROFIL”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : TIBERIU SOARE

Program :
Adrian Enescu – Audio Games
Viorel Munteanu – lucrare în primă audiție
Mihai Măniceanu – lucrare în primă audiție
Adrian Iorgulescu – lucrare în primă audiție
Octavian Nemescu – lucrare în primă audiţie
Tristan Murail – L’Esprit des dunes

Lawrence Foster

DUMINICĂ, 08.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA ROMÂNĂ DE TINERET

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : LAWRENCE FOSTER

Program :
D. Dediu – Frenesia pentru orchestră op. 84 (2000)
J. Brahms – Dublul concert pentru vioară, violoncel şi orchestră în la minor op. 102
Solişti : PINCHAS ZUKERMAN – vioară
AMANDA FORSYTH – violoncel
M. Ravel – Rapsodie espagnole
M. Ravel – Pavane pour une infante défunte
M. Ravel – Alborada del Gracioso
M. Ravel – Bolero

George Petrou

DUMINICĂ, 08.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Orchestra “ARMONIA ATENEA”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : GEORGE PETROU

Program :
G.F. Händel – Alessandro HWV21 (Dramă muzicală în trei acte)
Libret : Paolo Rolli

Distribuţia :
Alessandro – MAX EMANUEL CENČIĆ
Rosanne – JULIA LEZHNEVA
Lisaura – LAURA AIKIN
Clito – PAVEL KUDINOV
Tassile – XAVIER SABATA
Leonato – JUAN SANCHO
Cleone – VASILY KHOROSHEV

John Malkovich

LUNI, 09.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

WIENER AKADEMIE

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : MARTIN HASELBÖCK

Program :
“THE INFERNAL COMEDY” – O crimă melodramatică
Scenariul şi regia : Michael Sturminger
Muzica : A. Vivaldi, J. Haydn, W.A. Mozart, L. van Beethoven etc.

Narator : JOHN MALKOVICH

Solişti :
LAURA AIKIN – soprană
BERNARDA BOBRO – soprană
ALEKSANDRA ZAMOJSKA – soprană

LUNI, 09.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALETCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

CORUL şi ORCHESTRA OPEREI NAŢIONALE BUCUREŞTI

Opera Naţională Bucureşti
“OTELLO” de Giuseppe Verdi

Dirijor : KERI-LYNN WILSON

Regizor : VERA NEMIROVA

Scenograf : VIORICA PETROVICI

Maestru de cor : STELIAN OLARIU

Asistent regie : IRINA MACOVEI 

Distribuţia :
Otello – PETER SEIFFERT
Desdemona – NICOLETA ARDELEAN
Iago – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Cassio – CRISTIAN MOGOŞAN
Roderigo –ANDREI LAZĂR
Ludovico – MARIUS BOLOŞ
Montano – IUSTINIAN ZETEA
Un herald – IONUŢ GAVRILĂ
Emilia – MARIA JINGA

Tifu Anna

LUNI, 09.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA SINFONICA NAZIONALE DELLA RAI

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : Juraj Valčuha
Solistă : ANNA TIFU – laureată a Concursului Internaţional “George Enescu” – ediţia 2007

Program :
G. Enescu – Suita nr. 1 în Do Major op. 9
Philip Glass – 
Concertul nr. 1 pentru vioară şi orchestră (1987)
I. Stravinski –
 Suita pentru orchestră “Ritualul primăverii”

LUNI, 09.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

BRAŞOV

TRIO PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, AMANDA FORSYTH, ANGELA CHENG

Program :
W.A. Mozart – Sonata pentru vioară şi pian în Sol Major K 301
R. Schumann – Adagio şi Allegro pentru violoncel şi pian în La bemol Major op. 70
Z. Kodály – Duo pentru vioară şi violoncel op. 7
F. Mendelssohn – Trio pentru pian în re minor op. 49

Cvartetul Voces

MARŢI, 10.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

CVARTETUL VOCES

Ateneul Român

Program :
J. S. Bach – Arta Fugii BWV 1080

Juraj Valcuha

MARŢI, 10.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA SINFONICA NAZIONALE DELLA RAI

Dirijor : JURAJ VALCUHA

Program :
O. Respighi – Poemul simfonic “Fontane di Roma”
Cl. Debussy – “Marea”, trei schiţe simfonice pentru orchestră
M. Ravel – “Daphnis şi Chloe” – fragmente din baletul in trei părţi imaginat de M. Fokin

Rudolf Buchbinder

MIERCURI, 11.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

ORCHESTRA FILARMONICII “GEORGE ENESCU”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor şi solist : RUDOLF  BUCHBINDER

Program :
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 1 pentru pian şi orchestră în Do Major op. 15
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 2 pentru pian şi orchestră în Si bemol Major op. 19
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 3 pentru pian şi orchestră în do minor op. 37

Antonio Pappano

MIERCURI, 11.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA şi CORUL DELL’ACCADEMIA NAZIONALE DI SANTA CECILIA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : ANTONIO PAPPANO

Program :
M. Ravel – “Une barque sur l’océan” (partea a 3-a din suita “Miroirs”) op. 43a
G. Enescu – Poemul simfonic “Vox Maris” op. 31
Solist : MARIUS VLAD BUDOIU – tenor
A. Dvořák – Simfonia nr. 9 în mi minor op. 95 “Din lumea nouă”

Rudolf Buchbinder1

JOI, 12.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

ORCHESTRA FILARMONICII “GEORGE ENESCU”

Ateneul Român
Dirijor şi solist : RUDOLF  BUCHBINDER

Program :
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 4 pentru pian şi orchestră în Sol Major op. 58
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 5 pentru pian şi orchestră în Mi bemol Major op. 73 “Imperialul”

Liudmyla Monastyrska

JOI, 12.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA şi CORUL DELL’ACCADEMIA NAZIONALE DI SANTA CECILIA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : ANTONIO PAPPANO

Program :
G. Verdi – Requiem

Solişti :
LIUDMYLA MONASTYRSKA – soprană
EKATERINA SEMENCHUK – mezzo-soprană
JOHAN BOTHA – tenor
RENÉ PAPE – bas

Gheorghe Costin

JOI, 12.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

TIMIŞOARA

ORCHESTRA FILARMONICII “BANATUL” TIMIŞOARA
Dirijor : GHEORGHE COSTIN 
Solişti : MANUELA IANA-MIHĂILESCU şi DRAGOŞ MIHĂILESCU 

Program:
G. Enescu – Suita a II-a în Do Major op. 20
Fr. Poulenc – Concertul în re minor pentru două piane şi orchestră FP 61
B. Bartók –  Suita “Mandarinul miraculos” op. 19

Claire Marie Le Guay

VINERI, 13.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALECUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL D’ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : ENRIQUE MAZZOLA
Solist : CLAIRE-MARIE LE GUAY – pian

Program :
J. Ibert – Bacchanale
A. Honegger – Concertino pentru pian şi orchestră H 55
M. Ravel – Concertul pentru mâna stângă în Re Major op. 82
D. Milhaud – Le Bœuf sur le toit op. 58
M. Ravel – Suita nr. 2 pentru orchestră op. 57b “Daphnis et Chloé”

Vladimir Jurowski 1

VINERI, 13.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : VLADIMIR JUROWSKI
Solist : ANIKA VAVIC – pian

Program :
N. Rimski-Korsakov – Uvertura Marele Paşte rusesc op. 36
S. Prokofiev – Concertul pentru pian şi orchestră nr. 3 în Do Major op. 26
A. Bruckner – Simfonia nr. 1 în do minor WAB 101

Christian Zacharias

VINERI, 13.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

ORCHESTRE de CHAMBRE de LAUSANNE

Ateneul Român
Dirijor şi solist : CHRISTIAN ZACHARIAS

Program :
W.A. Mozart – Simfonia concertantă pentru vioară, violă şi orchestră în Mi bemol Major K 364
W.A. Mozart – Simfonia nr. 40 în sol minor K 550

Altenberg Trio Wien

SÂMBATĂ, 14.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ALTENBERG TRIO WIEN

Sala mică a Palatului

Program :
D. Şostakovici – Trio nr. 1 în do minor op. 8 (1923)
G. Enescu – Trio în la minor (1916)
M. Ravel – Trio în la minor (1914)

Alissa Margulis

SÂMBATĂ, 14.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

ORCHESTRE NATIONAL D’ÎLE-DE-FRANCE

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : CRISTIAN LUPEŞ
Solist : ALISSA MARGULIS – vioară

Program :
A. Webern – Fuga (Ricercata) la 6 voci (după J.S. Bach – Ofranda Muzicală BWV 1079/5)
B. Bartók – Concertul nr. 2 pentru vioară şi orchestră SZ112, BB 117
G. Enescu – Simfonia nr. 2 în La Major op. 17

Leonidas Kavakos

SÂMBATĂ, 14.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : VLADIMIR JUROWSKI
CORUL ACADMIC RADIO
Dirijor : DAN MIHAI GOIA
Solist : LEONIDAS KAVAKOS – vioară

Program :
J. Brahms – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în Re Major op. 77
G. Enescu – Simfonia nr. 3 cu cor în Do Major op. 21

Christian Zacharias

SÂMBATĂ, 14.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

ORCHESTRE de CHAMBRE de LAUSANNE

Ateneul Român
Solist şi dirijor : CHRISTIAN ZACHARIAS

Program :
W.A. Mozart – Serenada nr. 9 în Re Major K 320 “Posthorn” (primele patru părţi)
W.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 23 pentru pian şi orchestră în La Major K 488
W.A. Mozart – Fantezia nr. 3 pentru pian în re minor K 397
W.A. Mozart – Rondo pentru pian în Re Major K 485
W.A. Mozart – Serenada nr. 9 în Re Major K 320 “Posthorn” (primele trei părţi)

Ilan Volkov

DUMINICĂ, 15.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

Ansamblul HYPERION INTERNATIONAL

Sala “Mihail Jora” a Societăţii Române de Radiodifuziune

Dirijor : Ilan VOLKOV
Program :
Maya Dunietz –  crea.
Liviu Ralea – « Periastron » pentru ansamblu şi sunete asistate de computer ( p.a.a.)
Horaţiu Rădulescu – Small Infinities Togetherness (1983) pentru global sources şi ansamblu (p.a.r.) – versiune scrisă şi dedicată Ansamblului Hyperion
Costin Cazaban – Calam pentru ansamblu şi sunete asistate de computer (p.a.r.)
Ilan Volkov/ Iancu Dumitrescu/ Andrei Kivu / Maya Dunietz/ Eran Sachs/ Yoni Silver / Haggai Fershtman/ Adam Sheflan – Intuitive Music – « pianissimo new project
Ana-Maria Avram – Spacetime-simetry (p.a.a.)
Iancu Dumitrescu – Early, before all times (II) (p.a.a.)
Ilan Volkov/ Iancu Dumitrescu/ Andrei Kivu / Maya Dunietz/ Eran Sachs/ Yoni Silver / Haggai Fershtman/ Adam Sheflan/  –  Intuitive Music 10 – Fortissimo New Project

DUMINICĂ, 15.09

13:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂI

NUOVA MUSICA CONSONANTE

Sala “Mihail Jora” a Societăţii Române de Radiodifuziune

NUOVA MUSICA CONSONANTE-LIVING MUSIC FOUDATION (USA), VOX NOVUS (USA), CENTER OF COMPUTER RESEARCH IN MUSIC AND ACOUSTICS, STANFORD UNIVERSITY (USA), EUROPEAN CONFERENCE OF PROMOTERS OF NEW MUSIC (ECPNM)

Interpretează :

GEORGETA STOLERIU – soprană

VLAD DIMULESCU – pian

CORINA BOLOLOI – vioară

FAUSTA DIMULESCU – pian

ŞERBAN NICHIFOR – violoncel

DANIEL MIHAI  – violonist

Program :

“Pioneers Songs” de Ned Hill, interpretata cu concursul autorului, un prestigios reprezentant al Culturii Americane.

“REZONANŢE ENESCIENE”
G. Enescu – Sonata nr. 1 pentru pian în fa diez minor op. 24
C-tin Silvestri – Piesă de concert nr. 3 pentru pian op. 25
R. Voisey – “Lament and Sorrow” pentru violoncel şi mediu electroacustic (p.a.)
V. Petculescu – “Reverberaţii” pentru violoncel solo
D. DaSilva – “Stabat” pentru violoncel solo (p.a.)
C. Chafe (USA) – “Free Motion” pentru violoncel şi mediu electroacustic
P. Constantinescu – “Cântec de adormit Mitzura”, lied pe versuri de Tudor Arghezi
S. McClellan (USA)– “Acolo”, lied pe versuri de Iulia Deleanu (p.a.)
M. Jora – “Ghicitoarea”, lied pe versuri de Tudor Arghezi
G. Enescu – “Eu ma duc, codrul ramane”, lied pe versuri populare
M. Marbe – “Ecoul unui omagiu” pentru vioară şi pian
G. Enescu – Balada pentru vioară şi pian
L. Alexandra – “Quasi Cadenza” pentru vioară solo
V. Cosma – “Concerto de Berlin” pentru vioară şi pian (p.a.)
M. Ciobanu – “Jurnal 99” pentru vioară şi mediu electroacustic

Otomo Naoto

DUMINICĂ, 15.09

17:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

HARMONIUS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA – OSAKA

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : OTOMO NAOTO
Program :
A. Jolivet – Concertul pentru flaut şi orchestră de coarde (1950)
Solist : IONUŢ BOGDAN ŞTEFĂNESCU – flaut
Yasushi Akutagawa – Triptic pentru orchestră de coarde
G. Enescu – Octuor în Do Major op. 7

Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Berlin

DUMINICĂ, 15.09

19:30

SERIA WAGNERCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

RUNDFUNK – SINFONIEORCHESTER BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MAREK JANOWSKI

Program :
R. Wagner – Rheingold

Distribuţia :
Wotan – EGILS SILINS
Donner – VALENTIN VASILIU
Froh – MARIUS VLAD BUDOIU
Loge – CHRISTIAN ELSNER
Alberich – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Mime – ARNOLD BEZUYEN
Fasolt – GÜNTHER GROISSBÖCK
Fafner – SORIN COLIBAN
Fricka – ELISABETH KULMAN
Freia – ALEXANDRA REINPRECHT
Woglinde – JULIA BORCHERT

Giulio Prandi

DUMINICĂ, 15.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

GHISLIERI CHOIR & CONSORT

Ateneul Român

“DEATH AND RESURRECTION” – între Baroc şi Clasicism
Un proiect al Fundației Royaumont (Franța) şi al Colegiului Ghislieri (Italia)
Dirijor : GIULIO PRANDI
Solişti : ROBERTA INVERNIZZI – soprană
SALVO VITALE – bas

Program :
W.A. Mozart – Regina Coeli în Do Major KV 108 (1771)
D. Perez – Mattutino de’ morti  (1774)

Marek Janowski

LUNI, 16.09

18:00

SERIA WAGNERCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

RUNDFUNK – SINFONIEORCHESTER BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MAREK JANOWSKI

Program :
R. Wagner – Walküre

Distribuţia :
Sigmund – TORSTEN KERL
Hunding – GÜNTHER GROISSBÖCK
Wotan – EGILS SILINS
Sieglinde – MELANIE DIENER
Brünnhilde – PETRA  LANG
Fricka – ELISABETH KULMAN

Vortice Dracula1

LUNI, 16.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALETSTOC EPUIZAT

VORTICE DANCE COMPANY

Opera Națională Bucureşti

Program :

“DRACULA”

Coproducţie : Vortice Dance Company, Opera din Macedonia
Regia şi coregrafia : Cláudia Martins, Rafael Carriço
Scenografia, videografia, sonoplastia : Rafael Carriço
Figurine : Jorge Liborio

Solişti : Cláudia Martins, Rafael Carriço, Maria Diogo, Rafaela Reis, Ângela Bacellar, Luz Bacellar,
Joana Puntel, Fábio Simões, Renato Vieira, Anna Kurlikova, Rita Pinheiro, Tiago Coelho

Regia tehnică : Nuno Martins
Designer de lumini, efecte audio-visuale : Luis Paz
Muzica : Wojciech Kilar, Philip Glass, S. Rahmaninov, Lou Reed

Corul Madrigal

LUNI, 16.09

19:30

ALTE EVENIMENTE

Madrigal

CORUL NAȚIONAL DE CAMERĂ “MADRIGAL”
Ateneul Român

Program:
Hieronimus Tragoudistis din Cipru – Canonul cel Mare (Cântarea a noua) sec. XVI
Guillaume de Machault – Kyrie – La Messe de Notre Dame (1364)
Moment bizantin 1
Josquin des Prez – Gloria – Missa Pange lingua (cca. 1514)
Moment bizantin 2
Giovani Pierluigi da Palestrina – Credo – Missa Papae Marcelli (1567)
Moment bizantin 3
William Byrd – Sanctus – Missa a quatro voci (1592-1593)
Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612) – Benedictus – Missa Dixit Maria
Moment bizantin 4
Tomas Luis de Victoria (1548-1611) – Agnus Dei – Missa “O magnum misterium” (1572)
Moment bizantin 5
Dan Dediu – Exultate – lucrare în stil neogregorian/bizantin (p.a.)

Truls  MØrk

MARŢI, 17.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

LUCERNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : JAMES GAFFIGAN 
Solist : TRULS  MØRK – violoncel

Program :
A. Dvořák – Concertul pentru violoncel şi orchestră în si minor op. 104 (B 191)
A. Dvořák – Simfonia nr. 6 în Re Major op. 60 (B 112)

Semyon Bychkov

MARŢI, 17.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

DIE MÜNCHENER PHILHARMONIKER

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : SEMYON BYCHKOV
Solist : GAUTIER CAPUÇON – violoncel

Program :
G. Enescu – Simfonia concertantă pentru violoncel şi orchestră în la minor op. 8
G. Mahler – Simfonia nr. 1 în Re Major

Fazil Say

MIERCURI, 18.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

LUCERNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : JAMES GAFFIGAN
Solist : FAZIL SAY – pian

Program :
G. Enescu – Issis (orchestraţie de Pascal Bentoiu – după schițele compozitorului)
Cu participarea Corului de cameră “PRELUDIU” al Centrului Naţional de Artă “Tinerimea Română”
Dirijor : VOICU ENĂCHESCUW.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 21 pentru pian şi orchestră în Do Major K.467
J. Haydn – Simfonia nr. 104 în Re Major H.1/104 “Londra”

Katia şi Marielle LabÈque

MIERCURI, 18.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

DIE MÜNCHENER PHILHARMONIKER

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : SEMYON BYCHKOV
Solist : KATIA şi MARIELLE LABÈQUE – pian

Program :
M. Ravel – Suita pentru pian “Le Tombeau de Couperin” (1918)
F. Poulenc – Concertul pentru două piane în re minor FP 61
C. Franck – Simfonia în re minor

Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Berlin

JOI, 19.09

17:00

SERIA WAGNERCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

RUNDFUNK – SINFONIEORCHESTER BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MAREK JANOWSKI

Program :
R. Wagner – Siegfried

Distribuţia :
Siegfried – STEFAN VINKE
Mime – ARNOLD BEZUYEN
Wotan (Wanderer) – EGILS SILINS
Alberich – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Fafner – SORIN COLIBAN
Erda – MARIA RADNER
Brünnhilde – CATHERINE FOSTER

Soliloquy – About Wonderland

JOI, 19.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALETSTOC EPUIZAT

VORTICE DANCE COMPANY

Opera Națională Bucureşti

“SOLILOQUY – ABOUT WONDERLAND”

Regia şi coregrafia : Cláudia Martins and Rafael Carriço
Scenografia, videografia şi sonoplastia : Rafael Carriço
Costume : Cláudia Martins
Regia tehnică : Nuno Martins
Designer de lumini şi efecte audio-visuale : Luis Paz

Muzica : Phillip Glass, Maurice Fulton, Kronos Quartet, Daft Punk,
Nino Rota, Eric Satie, Oswaldo Ferrés, Camille Saint-Saëns, Arvo Pärt,
Billie Holiday, Claude Debussy, Charlie Chaplin

Solişti : Cláudia Martins, Rafael Carriço, Maria Diogo, Rafaela Reis,
Joana Puntel, Fábio Simões, Renata Vieira, Anna Kurlikova, Rita Pereira,
Luz Bacellar, Angela Bacellar

Antal Zalai

JOI, 19.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

ORADEA

FILARMONICA DE STAT ORADEA
Dirijor : ROMEO RÎMBU
Solist : ANTAL ZALAI – vioară (laureat al Concursului Internaţional “G. Enescu” 2011)

Program :
G. Enescu – B. Bartók

Jordi Savall

VINERI, 20.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

HESPERION XXI – LA CAPELLA REIAL DE CATALUNYA

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : JORDI SAVALL

Program :
La Dinastia Borgia

Concept artistic al proiectului : Jordi Savall & Montserrat Figueras 
Dramaturgia şi surse istorice : Josep Piera & Manuel Forcano 
Colaboratori : Josep Piera, Joan F. Mira, Vicent Ros 

Solişti : Adriana Fernandez, Pascal Bertin, José Hernández-Pastor,
Lluís Vilamajó, Francesc Garrigosa, Furio Zanasi, Daniele Carnovich,
Josep Piera, Francisco Rojas, Daniele Carnovich

Maxim Quartet

VINERI, 20.09

19:00

ALTE EVENIMENTE

Ploieşti – MAXIM Quartet – Turneu naţional CLASSIC REMIX

Horia Maxim – pian

Mihaela Anica – flaut

Fernando Mihalache – acordeon

Săndel Smărăndescu – contrabas

PLOIEŞTI
Sala Filarmonicii “Paul Constantinescu”

Program:
Transcripţii şi aranjamente după lucrări de  F. Schubert, P. I. Ceaikovski, A. Glazunov, I. Stravinski, F. Liszt, Dan Dediu

James Judd

VINERI, 20.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ORCHESTRA NAŢIONALĂ RADIO

Sala Mare a Palatului

CORUL ACADEMIC RADIO
CORUL DE COPII RADIO

Dirijor : JAMES JUDD
Dirijorul Corului : DAN MIHAI GOIA
Dirijorul Corului de copii : VOICU POPESCU

Program :
B. Britten – War Requiem op. 66

Solişti :
MICHAELA KAUNE – soprană
KIM BEGLEY – tenor
ADRIAN ERÖD – bariton

New Image

VINERI, 20.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

SAINT MARTIN IN THE FIELDS

Dirijor : Sir. NEVILLE MARRINER

Solist : ANTONIO MENESES – violoncel
Program :
Sir E. Elgar – Introducere şi Allegro pentru orchestră de coarde op. 47

Sir E. Elgar – Concertul pentru violoncel şi orchestră în mi minor op. 85

Sir E. Elgar – Enigma Variation op. 36

VINERI, 20.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

SIBIU

HESPERION XXI
LA CAPELLA REIAL DE CATALUNYA 

Dirijor : JORDI SAVALL

Program :
La Dinastia Borgia

Concept artistic al proiectului : Jordi Savall & Montserrat Figueras 
Dramaturgia şi surse istorice : Josep Piera & Manuel Forcano
Colaboratori : Josep PieraJoan F. MiraVicent Ros 

Solişti : Adriana Fernandez, Pascal Bertin, José Hernández-Pastor,
Lluís Vilamajó, Francesc Garrigosa, Furio Zanasi, Daniele Carnovich,
Josep Piera, Francisco Rojas, Daniele Carnovich

Leonel Morales

VINERI, 20.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

BACĂU – Sala “ATENEU”

FILARMONICA “M. JORA” BACĂU
Dirijor : OVIDIU BĂLAN
Solist : LEONEL MORALES – pian

Program :
S. Rachmaninov – Concertul nr. 3 pentru pian şi orchestră în re minor op. 30
I. Stravinski – Ritualul primăverii

Laurent Albrecht Breuninger

SÂMBATĂ, 21.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

LAURENT ALBRECHT BREUNINGER & THOMAS DUIS

Sala mică a Palatului

Recital :
LAURENT ALBRECHT BREUNINGER – vioară
THOMAS DUIS – pian

Program :
Cl. Debussy – Sonata pentru vioară şi pian în sol minor L 140
L. Vierne – Sonata pentru vioară şi pian în sol minor op. 23
G. Enescu – Sonata nr. 3 pentru vioară şi pian în la minor “în caracter popular românesc” op. 25
M. Ravel – Rapsodia pentru vioară şi pian op. 76 “Tzigane”

Jean Claude Pennetier

SÂMBATĂ, 21.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

Recital JEAN-CLAUDE PENNETIER – pian

Recital JEAN-CLAUDE PENNETIER – pian
Ateneul Român

Program :
G. Fauré – Nocturna nr. 12 în mi minor op. 107
G. Fauré – Barcarola nr. 11 în sol minor op. 105
F. Busoni – Sonatina nr. 2 BV 259
G. Enescu – Sonata nr. 1 pentru pian în fa diez minor op. 24,1
Cl. Debussy – La cathédrale engloutie
G. Enescu – Suita nr. 3 pentru pian op. 18 “Carillon nocturne”
Cl. Debussy – 12 studii pentru pian (Caietul 2)
(7. Pour les degrés chromatiques; 8. Pour les agreements; 9. Pour les notes répétées; 10. Pour les arpèges composes; 11. Pour les sonorités opposées; 12. Pour les accords)

Maxim Quartet

SÂMBATĂ, 21.09

19:00

ALTE EVENIMENTE

Craiova – MAXIM Quartet – Turneu naţional CLASSIC REMIX

Horia Maxim – pian
Mihaela Anica – flaut
Fernando Mihalache – acordeon
Săndel Smărăndescu – contrabas

CRAIOVA

Sala Filarmonicii “Oltenia”

Program:
Transcripţii şi aranjamente după lucrări de  F. Schubert, P. I. Ceaikovski, A. Glazunov, I. Stravinski, F. Liszt, Dan Dediu

Mariss Jansons

SÂMBATĂ, 21.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

ROYAL CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA AMSTERDAM

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MARISS JANSONS
Solist : EMANUEL AX – pian

Program :
L. van Beethoven – Concertul nr. 3 pentru pian şi orchestră în do minor op. 37
R. Strauss – O viaţă de erou op. 40

Sir Neville Marriner

SÂMBATĂ, 21.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

SAINT MARTIN IN THE FIELDS

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : Sir NEVILLE MARRINER
Solist : BORIS BROVTSYN – vioară

Program :
F. Mendelssohn – Uvertura “Ruy Blas”
F. Mendelssohn – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în mi minor op. 64
F. Mendelssohn – Visul unei nopți de vară (integral)

Lisa Batiashvili

DUMINICĂ, 22.09

11:00

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

ROYAL CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA AMSTERDAM

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MARISS JANSONS
Solist : LISA BATIASHVILI – vioară

Program :
G. Enescu – Rapsodia nr. 1 în La Major op. 11,1
S. Prokofiev – Concertul nr. 1 pentru vioară şi orchestră în Re Major op. 19
S. Prokofiev – 3 selecţiuni din Suita “Romeo & Julieta”
I. Stravinsky – Suita “Pasărea de foc” (1919)

Rundfunk Sinfonieorchester Berlin

DUMINICĂ, 22.09

17:00

SERIA WAGNERCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

RUNDFUNK – SINFONIEORCHESTER BERLIN

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MAREK JANOWSKI

Program :
R. Wagner – Amurgul zeilor

Distribuţia :
Siegfried – STEFAN VINKE
Gunther – VALENTIN VASILIU
Alberich – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Hagen – ERIC HALFVARSON
Brünnhilde – PETRA LANG
Gutrune – ALEXANDRA REINPRECHT
Waltraute – ELISABETH KULMAN
Norn 2 – ELISABETH KULMAN

Maxim Venegerov

DUMINICĂ, 22.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

BRAŞOV

“VIRTUOZII” din BUCUREŞTI
Dirijor : MAXIM VENGEROV

Program :
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru două viori şi orchestră în re minor BWV 1043
Solişti : MAXIM VENGEROV – vioară
VLAD STĂNCULEASA – vioară
W.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 5 pentru vioară şi orchestră în La Major K 219 “Turkish”
Solist : MAXIM VENGEROV – vioară
W.A. Mozart – Simfonia nr. 40 în sol minor K 550

Evgeny Kissin

LUNI, 23.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

EVGENY KISSIN

Program:

Fr. Schubert – Sonata nr. 17 în Re Major D 850 op. 53

Al. Scriabin – Sonata nr. 2 în sol diez minor op. 19

Al. Scriabin – Studii op. 8, nr. 2 în fa diez minor, nr. 4 în Si Major, nr. 5 în Mi Major, nr. 8 în La bemol Major, nr. 9 în sol diez minor, nr. 11 în Si bemol minor, nr. 12 în re diez minor

Sakari Oramo

LUNI, 23.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ROYAL STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : SAKARI ORAMO
Solist : STEPHEN HOUGH – pian

Program :
A. Hillborg – Exquisite Corpse
J. Brahms – Concertul nr. 1 pentru pian şi orchestră în re minor op. 15
C. Nielsen – Simfonia nr. 2 op. 16 (FS 29) “The Four Temperaments”

Vlad Stanculeasa

MARŢI, 24.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

“VIRTUOZII” din BUCUREŞTI

Ateneul Român
Dirijor şi solist : MAXIM VENGEROV

Program :
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru două viori şi orchestră în re minor BWV 1043
Solişti : MAXIM VENGEROV – vioară
           VLAD STĂNCULEASA – vioară
W.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 3 pentru vioară şi orchestră în Sol Major K 216
W.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 5 pentru vioară şi orchestră în La Major K 219 “Turkish”
W.A. Mozart – Simfonia nr. 41 în Do Major K 551 “Jupiter”

Gigi Caciuleanu

MARŢI, 24.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALET

La Follia In William Shakespeare de Gigi Căciuleanu – PREMIERA

Spectacol de teatru coregrafic prezentat în cadrul “Întâlnirilor JTI”

Teatrul Bulandra – Sala “Liviu Ciulei”
Cu participarea extraordinară a actorilor Victor Rebengiuc, Coca Bloos
Decor, Costume, Imagine – Octavian Neculai
Muzica – Paul Ilea
Designer de lumini – Alexandru Darie
Asistent Coregraf – Lelia Marcu Vladu
Asistent Décor – Vladimir Iuganu
Asistent Costume – Sorina Iuganu
Actori : Cornel Scripcaru, Adrian Ciobanu, Ioana Macaria, Marius Chivu, Camelia Maxim, Daniela Nane, Anca Androne, Rodica Lazar, Antoaneta Cojocaru, Ioana Anton
DansActori : Ramona Barbulescu, Rasmina CalbAjos, Ioana Macarie, Diana Spiridon, Ioana Marchidan, Vanda Ştefănescu, Arcadie Rusu, Cristian Nanculescu, Adrian Nou, IstvAn TegLAs Alexandru Calin, Lari Giorgescu, Ştefan Lupu
Spectacol prezentat în cadrul Programului “Bulandra per Musica” şi produs de Teatrul Bulandra şiFundaţia Art Production

Julian Rachlin

MARŢI, 24.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ROYAL STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : SAKARI ORAMO
Solist : JULIAN RACHLIN – vioară

Program :
G. Enescu – Suita nr. 2 pentru orchestră în Do Major op. 20
I. Stravinski – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în Re Major
J. Sibelius – Simfonia nr. 1 în mi minor op. 39

Louis Langree

MIERCURI, 25.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

CAMERATA SALZBURG

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : LOUIS LANGRÉE
Solist : HILARY HAHN – vioară

Program :
G. Enescu – Intermezzi op. 12
W.A. Mozart – Concertul nr. 3 pentru vioară şi orchestră în Sol Major K 216
Vaughan Williams – The Lark Ascending (1920)
W.A. Mozart – Simfonia nr. 41 în Do Major K 551 “Jupiter”

Vadim Repin

MIERCURI, 25.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : MIHAIL PLETNEV
Solist : VADIM REPIN – vioară

Program :
S. Prokofiev – Concertul nr. 2 pentru vioară şi orchestră în sol minor op. 63
P.I. Ceiakovski – Vals-Scherzo în Do Major op. 34
A. Glazunov – Anotimpurile op. 67

Evgeny Kissin

JOI, 26.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

Trio EVGENY KISSIN, SILVIA MARCOVICI & ALEXANDER KNIAZEV

Ateneul Român

Program :
Fr. Schubert – 4 improptus: op. 142  nr. 1 în fa minor, op. 142 nr. 3 în Si bemol Major, op. 90 nr. 3 în Sol bemol Major, op. 90 nr. 4 în La bemol Major
Fr. Schubert – Trio în Mi bemol Major op. 100

Tiberiu Soare

JOI, 26.09

19:00

SPECTACOLE DE OPERA ŞI BALETCUMPĂRĂ BILET 

CORUL şi ORCHESTRA OPEREI NAŢIONALE BUCUREŞTI

Opera Națională Bucureşti
“OEDIPE”
 de George Enescu
Libretul : Edmond Fleg

Dirijor : ADRIAN MORAR
Regizor : ANDA TĂBĂCARU-HOGEA
Scenograf : VIORICA PETROVICI
Coregraf : RĂZVAN MAZILU 
Maestru de cor : STELIAN OLARIU

Distribuţia :
Oedipe – ŞTEFAN IGNAT
Tiresias – HORIA SANDU
Creon – VICENŢIU ŢĂRANU
Păstorul – LIVIU INDRICĂU 
Marele Preot – MARIUS BOLOŞ
Phorbas – SORIN DRĂNICEANU
Străjerul – MIHNEA LAMATIC
Teseu – ŞERBAN VASILE
Laios – HECTOR LOPEZ
Iocasta – OANA ANDRA
Sfinxul – ANDRADA IOANA ROŞU
Antigona – SIMONA NEAGU
Meropa – ANTONELA BÂRNAT

Maxim Quartet

JOI, 26.09

19:00

ALTE EVENIMENTE

Piteşti – MAXIM Quartet – Turneu naţional CLASSIC REMIX

Horia Maxim – pian
Mihaela Anica – flaut
Fernando Mihalache – acordeon
Săndel Smărăndescu – contrabas

Casa de Cultură a Sindicatelor

Program:
Transcripţii şi aranjamente după lucrări de  F. Schubert, P. I. Ceaikovski, A. Glazunov, I. Stravinski, F. Liszt, Dan Dediu

Boris Berezovsky

JOI, 26.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
CORUL FILARMONICII “GEORGE ENESCU”
Dirijor : HORIA ANDREESCU
Dirijorul corului : ION IOSIF PRUNNER 

Program :
Fr. Liszt – Concertul nr. 1 pentru pian şi orchestră în Mi bemol Major S.124
Solist : BORIS BEREZOVSKY – pian
G. Mahler – Simfonia nr. 2 “Resurrection Symphony”
Solişti : ANITA HARTIG – soprană
BERNARDA FINK – mezzo-soprană

Borjan Canev

JOI, 26.09

CONCERTE ÎN ŢARĂ

ARAD

FILARMONICA DE STAT ARAD
Dirijor : BORJAN CANEV
Solist : ANTAL ZALAI – vioară (laureat al Concursului Internaţional “G. Enescu” 2011)

Program :
G. Enescu – B. Bartók

Marin Cazacu

VINERI, 27.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

VIOLONCELLISSIMO

Ateneul Român
Dirijor : MARIN CAZACU
Solişti : MARIN CAZACU – violoncel
            SIMINA IVAN – soprană

T. Albinoni – Adagio
S. Mercadante – Parola prima din Oratoriul “Ultimele şapte cuvinte” pentru soprană şi orchestră de violoncele
H. Lobos – Bachianas Brasileiras nr. 1 pentru violoncele
H. Lobos – Bachianas Brasileiras nr. 5 pentru soprană şi violoncele
J. Schrammel – Marş
A. Dvořák – Doloroso
C-tin Dimitrescu – Dans ţărănesc
J. Offenbach – Barcarola
J. Offenbach – Can Can
A. Piazzolla – Oblivion
A.Viloldo  – Tango “El Choclo”
A. Piazzolla – Libertango
Mozart / Mifune – Alla Turca Jazz

Andrew Litton

VINERI, 27.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIISTOC EPUIZAT

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
Dirijor : ANDREW LITTON
Solist : ALEXANDRA DARIESCU – pian

Program :

J. Brahms – Uvertura Academică în do minor op. 80
E. Grieg – Concertul pentru pian şi orchestră în la minor op. 16
P.I. Ceaikovski – Simfonia nr. 6 în si minor op. 74 “Patetica”

Viktoria Mullova

VINERI, 27.09

22:30

CONCERTELE DE LA MIEZUL NOPŢIISTOC EPUIZAT

ACCADEMIA BIZANTINA

Ateneul Român

Dirijor şi clavecin : OTTAVIO DANTONE

Solistă: VIKTORIA MULLOVA – vioară

Program :
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în la minor BWV 1041
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru vioară, clavecin şi orchestră (transcripţie BWV 1060)
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în Re Major (transcripţie BWV 1053)
J.S. Bach – Concertul pentru vioară şi orchestră în Mi Major BWV 1042

The Schubert Ensemble

SÂMBATĂ, 28.09

11:00

MUZICA SEC. XXI – WORKSHOP // ENESCU ŞI CONTEMPORANII SĂICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

THE SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE

Sala mică a Palatului

Program :
Frank Bridge – Fantezie pentru cvartet cu pian în fa diez minor H. 94
G. Fauré – Cvartetul cu pian nr. 1 în do minor op. 15
G. Enescu – Cvartetul cu pian nr. 1 în Re Major op. 16 (1909)

Murray Perahia

SÂMBATĂ, 28.09

17:00

RECITALURI ŞI CONCERTE CAMERALESTOC EPUIZAT

MURRAY PERAHIA

Ateneul Român
Recital MURRAY PERAHIA – pian

Program :
J. S. Bach  – Suita franceză nr. 4 în Mi bemol Major BWV 815
L. van Beethoven – Sonata nr. 23 în fa minor op. 57 “Appasionata”
R. Schumann – Faschingsschwank aus Wien op. 26
F. Chopin – TBA
F. Chopin – Scherzo nr. 2 în Si bemol Major op. 31

Dmitry  Sitkovetsky

SÂMBATĂ, 28.09

19:30

MARI ORCHESTRE ALE LUMIICUMPĂRĂ BILET 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Sala Mare a Palatului
CORUL ACADEMIC RADIO
CORUL DE COPII RADIO

Dirijor : CRISTIAN MANDEAL
Dirijorul Corului : DAN MIHAI GOIA
Dirijorul corului de copii : VOICU POPESCU 

Program :
G. Enescu – Capriccio pentru vioară şi orchestră (orchestraţie de Cornel Ţăranu după schiţele compozitorului)
Solist : DMITRY  SITKOVETSKY – vioară
G. Mahler – Simfonia nr. 3
Solist : JENNIFER JOHNSTON – mezzo-soprană

Comments Off on The George Enescu Festival: Hitting A High Note in Romanian Culture

Filed under ballet, Claudia Moscovici, CNN George Enescu Festival, Enescu Festival, Festivalul George Enescu, literature salon, literaturesalon, music, The Center for Cultural Projects of the Municipality of Bucharest, The George Enescu Festival: Hitting A High Note in Romanian Culture, Velvet Totalitarianism

How writers write fiction: Marching to the beat of your own drum

Seducer Cover

How writers write fiction: Marching to the beat of your own drum

by Claudia Moscovici

In an earlier article, entitled Why writers write, I explored some of the reasons why writers write fiction by looking into common misconceptions. I argued, for instance, that most writers don’t write in order to achieve fame or fortune, both of which are cosmically unlikely and therefore equally unlikely to last as primary motivations for writers past a very young (and naïve) age:

https://literaturesalon.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/why-writers-write-common-myths-about-being-a-writer/

Now I’d like to explore the process of writing (and misconceptions about it as well), by relying on my own experience as a novelist as well as by using as examples a few of my favorite fiction writers. Basically, I believe that there’s no rule, regimen or standard way of writing fiction: not only in terms of content and style (the diversity of fiction speaks for itself and renders this point quite obvious), but also in terms of the writing process itself.

The diversity in styles and approaches to fiction writing makes the job of those who teach Creative Writing un-enviably difficult. I’ve often read interviews with fiction writers and advice given writers offered by Creative Writing seminars, courses and websites that indicate certain standard procedures of writing fiction. Those usually include making a plot outline; writing a scheme for the structure of the short story or novel; disciplining and pacing yourself as a creative writer in specific ways. Some teachers, writers and courses even suggest that fiction writers need to isolate themselves from social media, email and other external “distractions” in order to concentrate better on writing fiction. Don’t get me wrong, I think such advice can be very helpful to many writers. Yet, at the same time, I still maintain that the creative writing process is as individual as writing styles. Each writer writes at his or her own pace and requires specific conditions.

Anna Karenina

There’s no doubt that all fiction writers need some uninterrupted periods of time to write fiction and a good place to do it, or A Room of One’s Own (1929), to allude to Virginia Woolf’s famous essay.  The reason for this is quite obvious: fiction writing requires stepping into imaginary situations and entering the minds of imagined characters. This delicate creative process would be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to achieve in short spurts of time or with constant interruptions. Speaking from personal experience, this is part of the reason why my first novel, Velvet Totalitarianism (2009), which I wrote when I was an academic teaching philosophy and literature and a young mom of two small kids, took me ten years to write. Once my children became older and more independent and (especially) once I became a full-time writer and art critic, I had the right conditions to finish The Seducer (2011), my second novel, in only three years. But I wouldn’t take this common denominator of fiction writers—needing some uninterrupted chunks of time, a space to write and periods of peace and quiet—to an extreme, to suggest that fiction writers need to isolate themselves from social media or external input in order to write fiction. There’s a delicate balance between needing external input and isolating oneself to write fiction (or to create art, a similar creative process). Nobody can dictate to any writer or artist what that balance is because it’s as individual as the personality of each writer and his or her writing style.

312023_358396104238261_112491399_n-1

In fact, probably many creative writers and artists find themselves in the position that Pablo Picasso describes to his  partner, Françoise Gilot: namely, that of needing external stimulation and contact with others as a rich source of inspiration for art, yet also, because of that, not having enough time to focus on each work of art. As Gilot recalls in her autobiography, Life with Picasso:

“Sometimes Pablo would begin a canvas in the morning and in the evening he would say, ‘Oh, well, it’s done, I suppose. What I had to say plastically is there, but it came almost too quickly. If I leave it like that, with only the appearance of having what I wanted to put into it, it doesn’t satisfy me. But I’m interrupted continually every day and I’m hardly ever in a position to push my thought right up to its last implication.’ […] I asked him why he didn’t shut out the world, and with it the interruptions. ‘But I can’t,’ he said. ‘What I create in painting is what comes from my interior world. But at the same time I need the contacts and exchanges I have with others.’” (Life with Picasso, Françoise Gilot, Anchor Books, New York, 1989, p. 123)

Cover of Velvet Totalitarianism

In our times, this balance between external contacts and inspiration and the solitude necessary to perfect any art form is probably even more difficult to reach because we live in an era of inundation from social media on a daily basis. Nowadays, fiction writers and artists rely upon the social media—Facebook, blogs, interviews with journalists–not only to speak about their art and share with readers (or viewers) what they’ve already produced, but also to find new sources of inspiration. For some fiction writers–particularly those who write historical fiction, true crime novels and psychological–  research and external input may be indispensable. Once again speaking from my own experience, when I wrote the historical novel Velvet Totalitarianism (Intre Doua Lumi), I had to read literally dozens of books on the history of Romania and about Romanian communism in order to be able to draw a historically accurate fictional depiction of that era. I couldn’t rely simply on inspiration or on fading childhood memories, since I had left the country at a relatively young age and wanted my novel to be partly based on actual facts, not only about invented characters and situations. When I wrote my second novel, The Seducer, on the subject of psychopathic seduction, I became even more dependent on external sources of information. I relied especially on blogs, since at the time there were relatively few books published on the subject of psychopaths and other social predators. Most of the information on the subject, particularly testimonials by victims which were extremely helpful, could be found on blogs such as lovefraud.com, which I read with great interest as background for writing fiction about a psychopathic seducer.

I believe that how you write—the process of fiction writing itself, starting from the space you right in; how fast or slow you pace yourself; the conditions and interruptions you choose or that are imposed upon you—does NOT determine the QUALITY of your fiction. But these conditions, and the balance you find as a fiction writer between isolation and external input—has a significant impact upon the QUANTITY and even the style of your fiction.  The best advice I can offer any fiction writer is to find his or her own balance that works for them rather than rely upon generic advice. I guess that’s a paradoxical way of saying the best advice I have is not to follow any general advice and choose instead what works for your situation, personality and style.  To support my case for the importance of marching to the beat of your own drum, I’d like to offer examples from some of my favorite writers.

balzac-la-comedie-humaine

1. Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850) and La Comédie humaine

As a scholar of Comparative Literature specializing in 19th-century French fiction, it’s not surprising that my main examples will come mostly from the French classics. One of my favorite novelists, Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850), rivaled Napoleon in his ambition. In his wide-ranging work, La Comédie humaine, Balzac aimed to paint a literary portrait of “all aspects of society” during the period of the Restoration and the July Monarchy (1815-1848).  He wrote about 91 finished stories, novels and essays that capture almost every facet of French society and culture following the fall of Napoleon in 1815. Like many writers, his creative genius was spurred on by failure. After finishing school, Balzac apprenticed to become a lawyer, but decided pretty early on that he didn’t like the field. He then experimented with publishing, printing, becoming a critic and even a politician. All of these more traditional professions didn’t suit him, however.

Ultimately, Balzac decided to follow his dream of being a fiction writer. Given the scope of his literary ambition, he set for himself an extremely rigorous routine. He wrote at all hours of the day and night, staying awake by drinking many cups of strong coffee that ultimately damaged his health.  Throughout his life, Balzac’s difficult writing schedule—and lack of financial stability—strained his relationship with his family and even with friends. Despite writing dozens of novels and short stories, Balzac didn’t write quickly. He just worked long hours. Biographers document that he wrote approximately 15 hours a day. He took a nap after supper from 6 p.m to midnight, then woke up to write during the evening and night again. The author’s novels are greatly influenced by his life experiences, even though they’re not exactly autobiographical. Like Zola did after him, Balzac uses his observations of society to create fictional characters that offer a sweeping sketch of his era. His writing is a reflection of the balance he found between living and interacting with so many people from very diverse social backgrounds and the strenuous discipline he imposed on himself in order to fulfill his vast literary ambition.

2. Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) and Madame Bovary (1856)

Of course, writing a little may take just as much discipline and time as writing a lot. At the other end of the spectrum (at least in terms of quantity of writing), my favorite French writer, Gustave Flaubert, was far less prolific than Balzac, even though he was equally ambitious. Flaubert achieved international fame for his unforgettable novel, Madame Bovary (1856), as well as for a beautiful, innovative yet starkly honest (and even cynical) mode of writing that the author polished to perfection. For Flaubert, style was everything.  Avoiding all clichés, he edited fastidiously his short stories and novels, pursuing what he called “le mot juste” (the right word). Perfecting style in a few works took as much work for Flaubert as sketching an entire era in nearly 100 works did for Balzac. In his correspondence, Flaubert states that this perfected style didn’t flow naturally out of him. He had to work hard, and edit constantly, to approximate it.

Like many writers, Flaubert encountered his share of challenges and setbacks. By the time of his death, however, he became known as the master of French realism (despite his lyrical style, which is also regarded by critics as the last echo of Romanticism). The publication of Madame Bovary (1856), the story of the disillusionment and eventual suicide of a provincial doctor’s wife who (fruitlessly) seeks love and meaning through a series of adulterous affairs, was greeted by the public with scandal rather than admiration. When chapters of the novel were published in La Revue de Paris (October 1956 to December 1956), Madame Bovary was attacked as “obscene” by the public prosecutor. Flaubert became acquitted, however, the following year. Afterwards, the novel quickly became a best seller, going far beyond a succès de scandale. By the time of his death, Flaubert was considered as one of the greatest French writers of the century (and he still is).

No rule, advice or measure could apply equally well to a writer like Balzac as to a writer like Flaubert, except perhaps the very general tenet that each found his own balance and discipline in the process of writing to suit his writing style, personality and literary ambition.

rubato1

3. Snippets of the interview with Romanian writer Razvan Petrescu: Marching to the Beat of your own Drum

Perhaps no writer shows the relativity of the writing process—and even casts doubt upon the boundary conventionally drawn between fiction and nonfiction, or fact and imagination—as my friend, the Romanian writer Razvan Petrescu. I have already written about his latest collection of short stories in the following article:

https://literaturesalon.wordpress.com/2013/01/09/razvan-petrescus-rubato-the-coordinates-of-world-class-romanian-fiction/

This article has been translated and published in Romania on Editura Curtea Veche’s blog:

http://www.curteaveche.ro/blog/2013/01/15/rubato-de-razvan-petrescu-coordonatele-unei-proze-romanesti-de-clasa-mondiala/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rubato-de-razvan-petrescu-coordonatele-unei-proze-romanesti-de-clasa-mondiala

To continue our discussion, I recently interviewed him about his books, his life and the writing process for a series of articles published in the Romanian magazine Scrisul Romanesc and the blog Agentia de Carte. To my mind,  Razvan Petrescu exemplifies the meaning of the English expression “marching to the beat of your own drum,” both as a person and as a writer (since the two aspects are, after all, intertwined). What struck me most about his interview, from which I’m translating only a few bits and pieces here, is the fact that his nonfiction (meaning his answers to my very traditional, journalistic questions) reads like some of the best fiction I have ever read. His first answer, to my very standard question “When did you begin writing fiction?” reminds me of lines from one of my favorite novels, Lolita (1955), by the man I consider the greatest American novelist, the Russian-born Vladimir Nabokov. In this beautiful and lyrical passage of the novel, the narrator, Humbert Humbert introduces Annabel, his first love and the precursor to Lolita: “All at once we were madly, clumsily, shamelessly, agonizingly in love with each other; hopelessly, I should add, because the frenzy of mutual possession might have been assuaged only by our actually imbibing and assimilating every particle of each others soul and flesh; but there we were, unable even to mate as slum children would have so easily found an opportunity to do” (Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov, New York: Vintage International, 1997, p. 12).

Although Petrescu has a style of his own, of course, like Nabokov, he’s a master of style, whether he writes fiction or nonfiction. Speaking of which, if you believe that any course, author or teacher can draw a sharp distinction between fiction and nonfiction or tell any creative writer how to write, you may change your mind after reading parts of this humorous, honest, chaotic and–above all—unique and original interview with the writer and editor Razvan Petrescu. Enjoy the (non)fiction!

razvan-petrescu-foto-attila-vizauer

Claudia Moscovici: When did you begin writing fiction?

Razvan Petrescu: Around the age of 15, when I fell in love for the third time. She had long, wavy red hair and well-formed breasts. My wonder knew no bounds when I was faced with this enigmatic pyramidal structure. I was fascinated by other zones and became absent-minded. Which didn’t provoke any particular happiness, given the fact that I was still expected to do various practical things, which included painting the walls, as I was dreaming with my hand shielding my forehead. I was thus overcome by a terrible love. It was autumn, the leaves were falling, the baby birds were hatching, while I was meandering in front of her house in my high school uniform with the number of my school inscribed on my left arm, my face turning melancholic-green with despair. She wasn’t in love with me yet. She would become swept in the feeling only at the moment when it left me and, because I had already read a whole slew of books (especially police thrillers and stories about submarines), I started writing her verses with an eye makeup pencil on a little notepad. I would read them alone at home and would cry seeing how much pain those words stolen from maximum suffering could provoke. When I read them again three years later, I couldn’t believe that I was able to write such idiocies and was overcome with a boundless sense of shame.

CM: What inspires you to write fiction?

RP: Almost anything. The blade of grass upon which climbs a little insect. The insect falls over, moves its little legs, I step on it with my shoe, a shoe meant for such events. The purplish clouds crossed by planes at sunset on the Paris-Slobozia route awaken in me aviatico-poetic catastrophes. I see the terrified passengers placing on their oxygen masks, screaming in them, waving their arms. The oxygen doesn’t work, the airplane changes course at the last moment exactly above IOR Park, over a little pond upon which floats a little ship with a hole in it. They all die of asphyxiation on the plane, while those on the ship drown in the greenish waters. … Usually I transform banal events with regular people into tragedies, or vice versa. I’m attracted to the dramatic, the grotesque, the painful. I describe what I observe, adding as many imagined things as possible to make the story more plausible, or conversely, more absurd.

CM: Who are the writers that inspire you most?

RP: Bach, Chekhov, Céline, Salinger, John Osborne, Raymond Carver, Mozart, Miles Davis, Donald Bartholomew,  Joyce, Faulkner, Schubert, Mahler, Lester Young, Cortazar, Buzzati, Garcia Marquez, Truman Capote, Coleman Hawkins, Chopin, Ben Webster, Oscar Peterson, Haneke, Pachelbel, Fellini, Tarkovsky, Beethoven.  The harmony of the piano. The king of the flies. Friday or the languages of the Pacific. … In order not to become mixed up, I’ve gotten into the habit of including my answer to this same question, which I’ve been asked by others and asked myself in other contexts, adding to it nonsensically titles, names, kinds, in order to leave an impression of culture pure and simple. But, above all, I do this in order to avoid boredom…

CM: No fiction is strictly autobiographical, but did you express any personal elements in your fiction. If so, which ones?

RP: I didn’t express anything, for the simple reason that everything I write and experience is fiction. In other words, if I included autobiographical elements in my fiction, they’re fictional. Example: the fact that I studied medicine. I didn’t. I wasn’t a doctor. I never lived in Bucharest. I didn’t go to high school number 43. I didn’t try to sleep with the high school beauty queen in ninth grade. I didn’t have a friend in kindergarten that died, and I didn’t go to her funeral. … I wasn’t a writer, I didn’t have a job, and thus I didn’t work at the magazines “The Word,” “Amphitheater,” the “Literature Museum,” the “Ministry of Culture,” All Publishing, Rosetti, Brukenthal and Curtea Veche Publishing….

CM: To follow-up my last question, what is the relation between your personal life and your life as a writer?

RP: It’s one of total harmony. They overlap. Any object or being that overlaps with another is happy. Given that I don’t need a job in order to make a living, I write all the time, especially at night. I’ve dedicated my life to literature for well over two decades. My personal life has been fulfilled in being a writer and vice versa. I had the good fortune of receiving good money by selling books and, also, through translations. Last month, when I signed a contract for the translation of my most recent book in Macedonia, they offered me almost 150 Euros. I had to renounce the retribution, since I know my value and it’s not quite so big. If I had accepted the payment for the author’s rights I’d have lost it completely, so I asked the editor to allow me to give him money.

Claudia Moscovici, Literature Salon

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Sandy Chila’s timeless classics: “Avec ton Amour” and “A Light that Dances Solo”

Sandy Chila

The music industry is (in)famous for hits that quickly become yesterday’s news. Most pop songs are played on the radio for about two to three months. During that short period of time, we hear them so often that we tire of them. Afterwards, we rarely run across those songs again: except, perhaps, years later on “oldies” stations. It’s rare and remarkable to come across hits that are so memorable, melodious and catchy that they have a staying power that renders them timeless classics. I’d count, for instance, many of the Beatles’ hits in this category, along with Frank Sinatra’s and Nat King Cole’s classic love songs, which are, indeed… unforgettable.

Sandy Chila’s songs, “Avec ton Amour” and “A Light that Dances Solo” have the quality and beauty of such timeless classics. It’s almost impossible to look away from the Tacori jewelers commercial, “Cupid’s arrow,” that features Chila’s song, “Avec ton Amour.” The song is both mesmerizing and memorable.

Bilingual and multicultural like its composer, “Avec ton Amour” features both French and English lyrics to a melody that harks back to the best songs of Salvatore Adamo or Frankie Valli. Making such a comparison takes nothing away from the song’s originality and uniqueness, of course. In fact, some of the most successful contemporary composers and singers—including Amy Winehouse, Norah Jones and Adele—incorporate elements from the best pop music of previous decades while also rendering them new. Timelessness in pop music, to my mind, implies a certain continuity, not only originality. The most talented new composers and musicians don’t fully reject the past or try to reinvent the wheel. Rather, they integrate previous popular musical traditions—be it swing, jazz, Latin music or French varitetes–into their original and quirky compositions and style. Sandy Chila represents the best of both worlds: he blends new and former musical styles as well as several cultural traditions that have inspired him.

http://factoryent.wordpress.com/category/press/

As Factory Entertainment (see above), the company that represents Chila states, “the musical journey of Sandy Chila (pronounced “key-la” has taken him around the world and back again.” Chila was born in Monaco, lived in Cairo and relocated to Southern California. Influenced by musical styles considered opposites—such as classical music and hard rock (he toured and recorded for Gilby Clarke of Guns N’ Roses)—Chila’s own talent shines in timeless love songs that have captured the attention of Tacori, one of the most prestigious jewelry companies in the world.  Although the signature Tacori “golden arrow” commercial—so elegant and simple, a flirtatious dance of diamond bands—includes only a tantalizing snippet of Chila’s romantic song, “Avec ton Amour”, it’s definitely worth listening to the entire song, which is available on amazon.com and other online music stores:

Avec ton amour:

http://www.amazon.com/Avec-Ton-Amour/dp/B003LUS80A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354231555&sr=8-1&keywords=Sandy+Chila

A light that dances solo:

Memorable, poetic lyrics sung in both English and French combine with a catchy and sophisticated melody to create a song that touches the heart and lingers on your mind. Part of “Avec ton Amour”’s staying power, I believe, can be explained in terms of its international flavor. I’m referring not only to its bilingual lyrics, but also to the various musical traditions it mixes and echoes–which range from Salvatore Adamo’s classics to tango—in an unforgettable song that appeals to fans of sensuality, melody and romance.

Helena Paper House

Chila’s talents are as wide-ranging and versatile as his musical style. He’s a singer, composer and producer. He’s created the music score for the independent films “Open House” (2007) and “Overloaded” (2009). More recently, he has collaborated with the beautiful and talented young singer, Helena Lalita, producing her songs “Sunlight” and “Paper House,” signed by Warner Brothers Records. I’m certain that Chila’s talents will shine through more and more in hit songs that will reach—and seduce—a mainstream audience.

http://www.HelenaLalita.com/

Claudia Moscovici, Literature Salon

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The Cube has landed (in bookstores)! Nat Karody’s new science fiction novel

The Cube by Nat Karody

The Cube, a new novel by Nat Karody, has landed (in bookstores)!

 

Were you disappointed by the ending to the series Lost? What follows is a story with as intricate a mythology as Lost’s but with an important difference: in the end it is all explained mechanistically, without resort to mysticism or religion. At the conclusion of the novel, the following summary of the core mystery, taken from the opening chapter, will be perfectly sensible: The Oopsah told a story, a majestic, exalted, beatific story of the coming of the end times and the rise of the Controller.

He learned how the world would end, who would destroy it, and how he, Zranga, could prevent it. He learned that he had been appointed by destiny – by the Controller himself – to carry out this mission. But above all he learned of the existence of a perfect being, the demigod Celeste, trapped beyond time in a cycle of eternal death. Only Zranga could rescue her, and to do this he had to place a giant door on the bottom of the Silent Sea, and kill the Great Man. Read on to found out how far Ivy Morven will go to stop Tobor Zranga from realizing his destiny, and how this alternative universe is bizarrely structured so that the most rational acts are the most extreme.

The Cube is well-written, ingeniously crafted and has great character development. Although clearly a science fiction narrative, The Cube also transcends its genre, to attract a broad audience. It tells the Romeo and Juliet story of a  young couple from adjacent sides of a  cubic planet who meet at an edge and develop a relationship in the midst  of a war that threatens to  destroy the planet. The story is unique  in creating an alternative  universe from first principles:  all matter is   oriented in one of the six Euclidian directions.

This simple deviation  from our own universe leads to the creation of cubic celestial bodies and   allows a reimagination of  transportation, power generation, warfare,   architecture, and lovemaking, among other things. As an example, the  political conflict   leading to war is that both inhabited sides of the   planet generate hydroelectric power by draining a large body of water on   one side   through edge sluices, a cheap and easy source of energy that will ultimately destroy the planet if the water is drained too far.

What  drives this story is the relationship of the two main characters,  a girl  escaping from a classified weapons facility with terrible secrets she   refuses to share, and a rural boy who literally catches her  when she leaps   over the edge and soon learns he is the target of international espionage.   The novel is organized around a series of   revelations of the girl’s   secrets culminating with an answer to the ultimate question — who is  Celeste?

As you can probably tell even from my brief description, The Cube is a multidimensional narrative (pun intended!) that could simultaneously described as a science fiction novel as well as a moving love story and a dystopic utopia fiction,  similar  to George Orwell’s 1984.  You can discover this alternative universe, governed by different laws of physics but similar political motivations and machinations for power as in our world, on the links below:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXP7xYtrVeU]

Claudia Moscovici, literaturesalon

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Filed under book review, Book Review of The Cube, Book Review of The Cube: A Novel by Nat Karody, book reviews, books, Claudia Moscovici, literary criticism, literary fiction, literature, literature salon, literaturesalon, love, love story, Nat Karody, new fiction, novel, novels, online fiction publisher, science fiction, The Cube, The Cube has landed (in bookstores)! Nat Karody's new science fiction novel, The Cube: A Novel, The Cube: A Novel by Nat Karody